Month: February 2021

Sharp Decline in US Breast Cancer Cases

Sharp Decline in US Breast Cancer Cases

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreA new analysis of breast cancer rates in American women released this week revealed a startling decline in the disease. Researchers believe that millions of older women refraining from taking hormone pills led to 14,000 fewer cases of tumors in 2003…According to a new analysis led by researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, presented at the 29th annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, the sharp decline may largely be due to the fact that millions of older women stopped using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in 2002.Investigators report that there was an overall 7 percent relative decline in breast cancer incidence between 2002 and 2003, and that the steepest decline — 12 percent — occurred in women between ages 50–69 diagnosed with estrogen receptor positive (ER-positive) breast cancer. This is the kind of breast cancer that is dependent on hormones for tumor growth. “It is the largest single drop in breast cancer incidence within a single year I am aware of,” says Peter Ravdin, M.D., Ph.D., a research professor in the Department of Biostatistics at M. D. Anderson.“Something went right in 2003, and it seems that it was the decrease in the use of hormone therapy, but from the data we used we can only indirectly infer that is the case,” he says.“But if it is true, the tumor growth effect of stopping use of HRT is very dramatic over a short period of time, making the difference between whether a tumor is detected on a mammogram in 2003 or not,” says Ravdin.The study’s senior investigator, Donald Berry, Ph.D., professor and head of the Division of Quantitative Sciences at M. D. Anderson, says he was, at first, very surprised by both the magnitude and the rapidity of the decline in incidence, but adds “it makes perfect sense” if you consider that use of HRT may be an important contributing factor to breast cancer development.“Incidence of breast cancer had been increasing in the 20 or so years prior to July 2002, and this increase was over and above the known role of screening mammography,” he says. “HRT had been proposed as a possible factor, although the magnitude of any HRT effect was not known. Now the possibility that the effect is much greater than originally thought all along is plausible, and that is a remarkable finding.”HRT provides both estrogen and sometimes also progestin hormones to women who are postmenopausal. The ongoing Women’s Health Initiative study of 16,608 women 50–79 years old using HRT was prematurely stopped in July 2002 when the combination of estrogen and progestin was found to significantly increase the risk of developing invasive breast cancer.Ravdin said about 30 percent of women older than 50 had been taking HRT in the early years of this decade, that about half of these women stopped using HRT in late 2002 after the results of the large study were announced. “Research has shown that ER-positive tumors will stop growing if they are deprived of the hormones, so it is possible that a significant decrease in breast cancer can be seen if so many women stopped using HRT,” he says.“It takes breast cancer a long time to develop, but here we are primarily talking about existing cancers that are fueled by hormones and that slow or stop their growing when a source of fuel is cut,” Berry adds. “These existing cancers are then more likely to make it under mammography’s radar.”But the researchers stress that because the analysis is based solely on population statistics, they cannot know for certain the reasons why incidence declined. “We have to sound a cautionary note because epidemiology can never prove causation,” he says. They considered whether other effects may be involved (such as decreased use of screening mammography and changes in the use of anti-inflammatory agents, SERMs or statins) but only the potential impact of HRT was strong enough to explain the effect.”They examined rates of breast cancer from nine regions across the country from 1990 to the end of 2003 and found that while incidence increased at 1.7 percent per year from 1990 to 1998, it began to decrease, relative to other years, 1 percent each year from 1998 to 2002. When that 1 percent increase was adjusted for age in each of those years, incidence from 1998 to 2002 stayed about the same, Ravdin says. “There were more cases of breast cancer being diagnosed, but that was because women were getting older and entering the higher risk pool.”But by the end of 2003, there was a 7 percent, age-adjusted decrease in the number of breast cancer cases diagnosed. With further analysis, the researchers discovered that decline in incidence was far greater in ER-positive breast cancer (8 percent) compared to ER-negative breast cancer (4 percent). And when they looked at women 50–69 years old, the decline in ER-positive cancer was 12 percent, compared to 4 percent in ER-negative breast cancers. After adjusting for age, the researchers concluded that there was an absolute decline of about 14,000 fewer women diagnosed with breast cancer in 2003 than in 2002. (University of Texas Cancer Center)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Making the World Safe for Big Cats

Making the World Safe for Big Cats

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreExplorer Alan Rabinowitz creates havens for tigers, jaguars, and leopards. (CS Monitor)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img

Jordan’s King Abdullah Makes First Visit to Post-Saddam Iraq

Jordan’s King Abdullah Makes First Visit to Post-Saddam Iraq

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreOn Monday, King Abdullah II of Jordan became the first Arab head of state to visit Iraq since Saddam Hussein’s regime collapsed in 2003. The brief and previously unannounced visit was seen as a sign that Iraq’s Arab neighbors finally are shedding their fear of a Shiite Muslim-led Iraq. (Most nearby countries, like Iran and Jordon are Sunni Muslim-led.) We are sorry. The content item you requested needs to be replaced since the sydicator has abruptly ended this news service. The Good News Network is committed to finding another version of this news story elsewhere and adding the replacement link by mid-January, 2009. Please check back!AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

How Bald Chickens Help Troubled Kids

How Bald Chickens Help Troubled Kids

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThey are miserable-looking creatures. Featherless, off-balance, skittish to the point of terror. Also, incredibly lucky. These are “rescue” chickens, formerly caged as egg producers in an industrial hatchery somewhere in southern Ontario. The chickens are being used as therapy animals to treat a small group of troubled children living in a nearby group home. Shepherd thought interacting with the chickens might help teach the boys empathy. “But they were already so gentle with them, right from the start,” she says. “They worry if the chickens are afraid or if its sweater is too tight.” (Continue reading in the Toronto Star) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Hot Water for Chile’s slums, Courtesy of the Sun

Hot Water for Chile’s slums, Courtesy of the Sun

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore Jacquelin Marin has no running hot water at home. For a while, she had no real home at all. But soon she’ll have both, with the sun heating water for her showers. Marin and her neighbors are part of a pilot program to install solar water heaters in the houses of low-income families. For Chile—a country with stark economic inequality and few fossil fuels—it’s a way to help the poor while also reducing greenhouse gas emissions. (READ the story in GlobalPost.com) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Researchers Develop New System to ‘Eliminate’ Batteries

Researchers Develop New System to ‘Eliminate’ Batteries

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreResearchers at the University of Bedfordshire have developed a new technique for powering electronic devices.The system, developed by Prof Ben Allen at the Centre for Wireless Research, uses radio waves as power.Believed to be a world first, the team claims it could eventually eliminate the need for conventional batteries.Small everyday gadgets like clocks or remote controls could utilize the “waste” energy of radio waves that are in the air alongside light waves and sound waves.(READ the story from BBC)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Apartment Building Offers “Communal Dog”

Apartment Building Offers “Communal Dog”

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreIt wasn’t just the rooftop pool, the indoor basketball court or the 24-hour concierge that made Mara Pillinger want to sign a lease at 2M, a new apartment building in Washington, D.C.Rather, one wrinkly, adorable four-legged tenant was “95 percent of the reason I moved in,” says Pillinger, a 29-year-old Ph.D. candidate in international relations at George Washington University.Emmy, a nearly 1-year-old English Bulldog, is the building’s communal pup.“I spend time with Emmy twice a day every day — it’s study breaks,” says Pillinger. “I just go in and plop down on the floor and play with her.” Emmy lives with the building’s property manager, Doug Crawford, full time. He cares for her and takes her to all of her veterinary and grooming appointments. But Emmy spends her days hanging out in the office and is available when residents want to come play with her, either in the office or in the building’s courtyard, which boasts a private “pet park.” (Emmy is only allowed to leave the building with Crawford or other members of the office team.)Assistant property manager Kaitlyn Luper says at least one resident a day comes by to take the pooch for a walk in the pet park.Pillinger first heard about the building when her friends sent her news stories about the communal dog.“A lot of our residents either saw information on Emmy through various media outlets or met her when they toured the building,” says Luper. “While it might not be the deciding factor for them to move into 2M, she has definitely given the building a lot of attention.”“The Sweetest Thing”New tenants Carolyn and Matthew ready Emmy for a walk around the courtyard – Instagram @2mpupFor Pillinger, Emmy provides the perfect balance of enjoying the company of a dog without the responsibility of caring for her own pet while she’s busy with her studies.“She’s the sweetest thing ever. She’s always happy to see you, always wants to play. She’s always sort of puzzled when she’s not the center of attention — not that that happens very often for her,” Pillinger laughs.Like Pillinger, new resident Carolyn Belcher, 22, would like to get a dog of her own someday. But she and her boyfriend just moved to the area from North Carolina and know it will take a while to establish their schedules so they know they’ll be home to take care of a dog.When her boyfriend’s brother told them about Emmy, they thought a building dog was the next best thing.“It’s kind of nice because it’s like having a dog without having to take care of a dog every day,” Belcher says. “So you have all the benefits of the dog without all the responsibility.” And if Belcher and her boyfriend decide to get a pet of their own, their new addition will be welcome in 2M’s pet-friendly environment.More From VetStreet.com:10 Brainiest Dog Breeds5 Shelter Pet Myths DebunkedHero Dog Defends Owner Against BearVetstreet.com is a pet website written by top veterinarians, pet health experts and professional journalists dedicated to giving you the most accurate information possible, so you can keep your dogs and cats healthy. The key is a well-informed owner and an expert veterinary care team.Photos via Instagram: 2MpupAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Kid Rock Surprises Fan With Down Syndrome On His 30th Birthday

Kid Rock Surprises Fan With Down Syndrome On His 30th Birthday

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreKid Rock surprised one of his biggest fans last week by attending 30th birthday dinner.In August, Dan McGurk, who has Down Syndrome, posted a video on YouTube inviting his favorite singer to his birthday party October 27.“I’m the biggest and number one Kid Rock fan,” he said in the video, showing off his collection of Kid Rock memorabilia. “Please be there for my 30th birthday … I hope you come.”The Detroit singer heard about the video and decided to grant McGurk’s wish, bringing along several gifts, including a custom Kid Rock guitar.(WATCH the video below beginning at 2:48)last_img read more

Shelter Cats Nurse Orphaned Puppies Back to Health (Photos)

Shelter Cats Nurse Orphaned Puppies Back to Health (Photos)

first_imgTwo baby pooches taken in at the City of LaGrange Animal Shelter in Georgia found themselves motherless and still too young to be fed solid food.RELATED: Shelter Dog Saves Puppy’s Life–And Both Get Adopted in Show of ThanksCoincidentally, two nursing felines didn’t mind taking in another mouth to feed – and the difference in species didn’t seem to get in the way of their motherly instincts.The pups will be nursed to full health and independence before being shipped up to Minnesota for adoption.Feed Your Friends a Purrfect Story… Click To SharePhotos by the City Of LaGrange Animal ShelterAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreDogs may be man’s best friend, but these two puppies were lucky there were also some friendly mama cats around to help them out.last_img read more

Scientists Create First Ever Flu Vaccine to Keep Your Dog Healthy

Scientists Create First Ever Flu Vaccine to Keep Your Dog Healthy

first_imgToday, veterinarians use vaccines that include inactivated or killed flu virus, but experts say they provide short-term, limited protection. Scientists led by Luis Martinez-Sobrido, associate professor in the department of Microbiology and Immunology created two “live-attenuated” vaccines against H3N8 canine influenza virus, which is currently circulating in dogs in the U.S. Past research shows that live-attenuated vaccines, made from live flu virus that is dampened down so that it doesn’t cause the flu, provide better immune responses and longer periods of protection.WATCH: Owl Flies Right Into Moving Car Window, Breaks Both Wings But Caring People Save itMartinez-Sobrido’s team used a genetic engineering technique called reserve genetics to create a live vaccine that replicates in the nose, but not in the lungs. The nose is where the virus first enters a dog’s body, so generating an immune response there could stop the virus in its tracks. If the vaccine were to get into the lungs it could create unwanted inflammation in response to the live virus. The study found the live vaccine was safe and able to induce better immune protection against H3N8 canine influenza virus in mice and dog tracheal cells than a commercially available inactivated vaccine.In a second study, the team used reserve genetics to remove a protein called NS1 from H3N8 canine influenza virus. Previous studies have shown that deleting the NS1 viral protein significantly weakens flu viruses so that they elicit an immune response but don’t cause illness. This approach has been used with human, swine and equine flu viruses to generate potential vaccines and was also safe and more effective than a traditional inactivated H3N8 influenza vaccine in mice and dog tracheal cells.The team is planning to test both live-attenuated vaccine approaches in clinical trials with dogs. The hope is to come up with new options to stem the spread of flu in shelters and kennels, and to avoid the transmission of a dog flu virus to people. As many dog owners and animal lovers are in close contact with dogs on a regular basis, Martinez-Sobrido believes its best to prevent dogs from getting the flu in the first place.LOOK: Romanian Shelter Gives Paraplegic Dogs Love, Care, and WheelchairsThe team is using this research to tackle other dog flu viruses, too. They’ve used the safety of these approaches to engineer a live-attenuated vaccine for the H3N2 canine influenza virus, which was introduced in the United States in 2015. Early results show that similar to the H3N8 vaccine, the H3N2 live-attenuated vaccine is able to protect against the H3N2 canine influenza virus and is more effective than the only currently available inactivated vaccine.(Source: University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry)Click To Share This Pawesome Story With Your Friends – Photo by University of Rochester School of Medicine and DentistryAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreIt’s that dreaded time of year – flu season. And we humans aren’t the only ones feeling the pain. Dogs can get the flu, too.Scientists at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry have developed, for the first time, two new vaccines for canine influenza. This research is not only important for improving the health of our furry friends, but for keeping us safe, too. Dogs that have been infected with multiple influenza viruses have the potential to act as “mixing vessels” and generate new flu strains that could infect people. This hasn’t happened yet, but experts say it’s possible.last_img read more