Category: psrscadm

World Cup confirmed for Killington

World Cup confirmed for Killington

first_imgKillington Pico Ski Resort Partners, LLC,Mikaela Shiffrin, one of international skiing’s biggest stars, is featured on the promotion for the Audi FIS Ski World Cup competition slated for November 26-27 at Killington. Shiffrin graduated from the Burke Mountain Academy in June 2014. She won the Olympic slalom championship in Russia earlier in the year to become the youngest Olympic skiing champion in history.Vermont Business Magazine A major international ski race is indeed heading for Vermont the weekend after Thanksgiving, despite concerns of the early date and unseasonably warm weather. Killington Resort, the largest four-season resort in Eastern North America, received a positive snow control announcement from FIS (International Ski Federation), the governing body of the Audi FIS Ski World Cup. According to FIS: “This is to inform you that the Audi FIS Ski World Cup races in Killington (USA) are confirmed following the official snow control from today 17th November 2016. As scheduled, the races will take place on 26th – 27th November 2016.”With this announcement, Killington Resort can assure international race teams and ski racing fans traveling to central Vermont for Thanksgiving Weekend that both the Giant Slalom and Slalom races will take place as scheduled on November 26 and 27.“This positive snow control news from FIS reinforces what we already knew – that Killington has ample snow on Superstar to host the world’s fastest female ski racers, and our mountain operations team has the knowledge and horsepower to make more snow in the early season than any other ski area in the country,” says Mike Solimano, president and general manager of Killington Resort and Pico Mountain. “Thanks to the hard work of our snowmaking team during every cold weather window this fall, we can now breathe a quick sigh of relief before jumping into the final stretch of preparation for this massive event.”Killington Resort opened to the public for skiing and snowboarding on October 25, and plans to make snow across multiple mountain areas during the approaching week-long window of very cold weather. With snowmaking now mostly concluded on Superstar trail, the World Cup race venue, Killington snowmakers will work to add a training run for World Cup racers on Skye Lark while also connecting open ski terrain to K-1, Snowshed and Ramshead base areas for public use, and adding more beginner and intermediate terrain ahead of the holiday period.“Killington has worked around the clock to ensure a successful return of the World Cup to the east for the first time in 25 years,” said USSA Vice President, Events Calum Clark. “Killington and Powdr have been strong partners in this endeavor and we are looking forward to showcasing our sport in our largest membership region.”A full schedule of events at Killington Resort during World Cup Weekend including race start times, autograph signings, movie premiers and a free concert by O.A.R., plus information on many free parking and shuttle bus options is available at www.killington.com/worldcup(link is external). Stay connected to Killington’s World Cup racing on social media with #beastworldcup. About Killington Resort Killington Resort is a four season destination sitting on 3,000 acres in the heart of Central Vermont’s Green Mountains. Killington boasts 92 miles of diverse snow sports terrain spread across six peaks including Pico Mountain, and served by the most expansive lift network and snowmaking system in Eastern North America. After the snow melts, Killington features an 18-hole championship golf course, the family-friendly Snowshed Adventure Center, 35 miles of mountain biking trails and 15 miles of hiking trails. The seemingly infinite après, dining, and lodging options have made Killington a world-class destination for East Coast skiers and riders for over 55 years. Visit www.killington.com(link is external) for more information and be social with #beast365.KILLINGTON, Vt. (November 17, 2016) – Killington Resortlast_img read more

XTERRA tucks into renewed partnership with T S Restaurants

XTERRA tucks into renewed partnership with T S Restaurants

first_img Related Four T S Restaurants on the island of Maui have renewed last year’s title sponsorships for the XTERRA Kapalua Trail Runs scheduled for Saturday 27 October 2013, at Kapalua, Maui.The four events will once again be known as:Hula Grill XTERRA 5K Trail RunDuke’s Beach House XTERRA 10K Trail RunKimo’s XTERRA Keiki RunLeilani’s XTERRA Run Course and Leilani’s Run Prime AwardsThese running events will be held in conjunction with the XTERRA World Championship off-road triathlon on Sunday 28 October. The Hula Grill XTERRA 5K Trail Run and the Duke’s Beach House XTERRA 10K Trail Run will offer runners an opportunity to race on the same trails that the world’s best triathletes will use the following day.“We at T S Restaurants are pleased to support such a world class organization as XTERRA on our home turf in West Maui,” said Ross Anderson, Vice President of Hawaii Operations for T S Restaurants. “We feel like our beachfront restaurants are a natural fit for the XTERRA athletes and their families.”This is the second year these trail runs will be staged in Kapalua; and the runners will be treated to picturesque and challenging courses that will take them from the beach, up to the mountains, and then back to the beach.“We are thrilled to have T S Restaurants back as the title sponsors for our XTERRA Kapalua Trail Runs,” XTERRA President Janet Clark said. “This partnership allows runners from all over the world to compete on a world championship course. It is truly a great opportunity for both Maui residents and visitors to the island.”The Hula Grill XTERRA 5K Trail Run and Duke’s Beach House XTERRA 10K Trail Run are open to runners of all ages and skill levels, and online registration is available.T S Restaurants will award US$100 gift certificates to the overall winners and top Maui resident finishers for both the Duke’s Beach House XTERRA 10K and the Hula Grill XTERRA 5K Trail Runs. Medals and other prizes will also be awarded to the top age-group finishers in both races.Also, these two trail runs will serve as a benefit for the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Maui organization, so every entry makes a difference. In addition, a Paul Mitchell cut-a-thon will be held at the site of the race. Runners and their families can get their hair cut by professional Paul Mitchell stylists, with donations benefitting the Challenged Athletes Foundation (CAF).The Kimo’s XTERRA Keiki Run is for boys and girls ages 10 and younger. It is free to enter, although parents must be present to sign a waiver form at the site of the race. Race distances will vary from 100 yards to 1 kilometre, depending on the age of the child. Parents are welcome to stay on the course as well.The Leilani’s XTERRA Run Course will be part of the XTERRA World Championship off-road triathlon. The Leilani’s Run Prime Awards will go to the competitors with the fastest times on the Leilani’s XTERRA Run Course during the triathlon. Gift certificates from Leilani’s restaurant will be awarded to the fastest male and female in three categories – professionals, age-group amateurs, and Maui residents – for a total of six certificates.Hula Grill, Duke’s Beach House, Kimo’s and Leilani’s are four of Maui’s finest restaurants, and all are located within a short driving distance of Kapalua, giving competitors and spectators a variety of dining options.“The unique feeling and setting of West Maui is exhibited at each of these four restaurants, and it is in keeping with what the XTERRA athletes and their families have come to expect when they get to the island of Maui,” XTERRA’s Clark added. “Dining at any, or all, of these restaurants can only enhance the experience for our athletes, whether it be eating a pre-race meal or celebrating with a post-race meal.”Founded in 1977 by Rob Thibaut and Sandy Saxten, T S Restaurants owns and operates 13 restaurants in Hawaii and California, including Duke’s Waikiki and Hula Grill Waikiki on Oahu; Kimo’s, Leilani’s on the Beach, Hula Grill Kaanapali and Duke’s Beach House on Maui; Duke’s Kauai and Keoki’s Paradise on Kauai; and Jake’s Del Mar, Sunnyside Restaurant and Lodge, Sandy’s Beach Grill, Duke’s Huntington Beach and Duke’s Malibu in California.www.xterraplanet.comwww.tsrestaurants.comlast_img read more

Effect of physical activity, nutrient supplementation interventions on cognition

Effect of physical activity, nutrient supplementation interventions on cognition

first_imgLinkedIn Two studies in the August 25 issue of JAMA examine the effect of physical activity and nutrient supplementation on cognitive function.In one study, Kaycee M. Sink, M.D., M.A.S., of the Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, N.C., and colleagues evaluated whether a 24-month physical activity program would result in better cognitive function, lower risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia, or both, compared with a health education program.Epidemiological evidence suggests that physical activity is associated with lower rates of cognitive decline. Exercise is associated with improved cerebral blood flow and neuronal connectivity and maintenance or improvement in brain volume. However, evidence from randomized trials has been limited and mixed, according to background information in the article. Share on Twitter Pinterest Sharecenter_img Share on Facebook Participants in the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study (n = 1,635; 70 to 89 years of age) were randomly assigned to a structured, moderate-intensity physical activity program (n = 818) that included walking, resistance training, and flexibility exercises or a health education program (n = 817) of educational workshops and upper-extremity stretching. Participants were sedentary adults who were at risk for mobility disability but able to walk about a quarter mile. Measures of cognitive function and incident MCI or dementia were determined at 24 months.The researchers found that the moderate-intensity physical activity intervention did not result in better global or domain-specific cognition compared with the health education program. There was also no significant difference between groups in the incidence of MCI or dementia (13.2 percent in the physical activity group vs 12.1 percent in the health education group), although this outcome had limited statistical power.“Cognitive function remained stable over 2 years for all participants. We cannot rule out that both interventions were successful at maintaining cognitive function,” the authors write.Participants in the physical activity group who were 80 years or older and those with poorer baseline physical performance had better changes in executive function composite scores compared with the health education group. “This finding is important because executive function is the most sensitive cognitive domain to exercise interventions, and preserving it is required for independence in instrumental activities of daily living. Future physical activity interventions, particularly in vulnerable older adult groups (e.g., ?80 years of age and those with especially diminished physical functioning levels), may be warranted.” Emaillast_img read more

FLU NEWS SCAN: H1N1 vaccine benefits, tracking H1N1 on campus, kids’ vaccine survey, avian flu in Mongolia

FLU NEWS SCAN: H1N1 vaccine benefits, tracking H1N1 on campus, kids’ vaccine survey, avian flu in Mongolia

first_imgApr 20, 2011Ohio estimates benefits of H1N1 vaccination during pandemicOn the basis of its own research, the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) estimates that its 2009 H1N1 vaccination efforts prevented 64 deaths, 1,400 hospitalizations, and 310,402 influenza cases during the 2009 pandemic. The vaccination drive also saved the state an estimated $8.4 million in H1N1-related hospital costs, the agency said in a press release today. The ODH estimated the number of deaths, hospitalizations, and illnesses prevented from Apr 12, 2009, through Apr 10, 2010. The researchers used a model published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to come up with the estimates. The ODH ordered and shipped 4.1 million doses of H1N1 vaccine to more than 3,000 providers during the pandemic, and it also released more than $50 million in federal public health preparedness funds to support vaccination clinics and other prevention efforts. “Ohio’s local health departments sponsored hundreds of mass vaccination clinics and provided strong local leadership that was integral in our success,” ODH Director Dr. Ted Wymyslo said in the press release.Apr 20 ODH press releaseOnline self-identification tool accurately reflected H1N1 on campusAn online system for Ontario university students to self-identify flu-like symptoms during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic was effective for surveillance and for lessening the burden on campus medical staff, a study found. Reporting in the Journal of American College Health, researchers say that 1,432 students at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ont., used the Web-based tool, and data show that the tool accurately reflected levels of absenteeism and flu on campus. The authors conclude, “The online, real-time surveillance tool was effective in monitoring influenza activity on campus, providing timely health advice, decreasing unnecessary visits to the campus medical clinic, and assisting local public health in surveillance activities.”Apr J Am Coll Health abstractSurvey tracks kids’ flu vaccine preferencesWhen it comes to flu vaccines, children rated efficacy and the intranasal route of delivery as the most important attributes, according to a survey designed to gauge their preferences. The survey report, published online yesterday by Vaccine, was sponsored and partially designed by MedImmune, the maker of FluMist, the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV). It included responses from 544 children aged 8 through 12 years who took part in a nationally representative online panel in August and September of 2009. The children were recruited through their parents’ participation in a nationwide online panel. The poll also asked kids to weigh different vaccine attributes and was designed to gauge their comprehension of the issues and the consistency of their answers. Efficacy was most frequently selected as the most important attribute at 45%, followed by mode of administration at 31%. The majority (69%) said they preferred the nasal spray. The authors found that 85% of children were able to complete the survey task. The group concluded that children’s answers were consistent and that children can be included in discussions about flu vaccination.Apr 19 Vaccine abstractH5 avian flu found in whooper swans in MongoliaThree whooper swans that were found dead on a lake in eastern Mongolia tested positive for an H5 avian influenza virus, according to a report Mongolian officials filed today with the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). The swans were found at Zegst Lake in Sukhbaatar province. In other developments, a low-pathogenicity flu virus found in poultry in eastern Nebraska has been identified as an H7N9 subtype, a US Department of Agriculture official reported via ProMED-mail, the disease reporting system of the International Society for Infectious Diseases. The posting by Randall L. Levings said an H7N9 virus was isolated from geese and guinea fowl in a backyard flock. The virus’s pathogenicity in chickens is being tested, he said.Apr 20 OIE report from MongoliaApr 19 ProMED-mail reportlast_img read more

ASP Scan (Weekly) for Dec 21, 2018

ASP Scan (Weekly) for Dec 21, 2018

first_imgEthiopian study shows potential of rapid diagnostic test for meningitisEthiopian researchers report that the introduction of a rapid molecular diagnostic test at a teaching hospital resulted in the first diagnosis of viral meningitis in routine clinical practice in Ethiopia. The study was published yesterday in BMC Infectious Diseases.In the single-center study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with suspected meningitis at Jimma University Specialized Hospital were analyzed using a multiplex, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based system and conventional microbiologic methods. The aim of the study was to investigate which infectious agents were responsible for meningitis in a region of Ethiopia where treatment decisions are usually based on clinical findings alone and bacterial meningitis is frequently diagnosed, resulting in antibiotic overuseOf the 218 CSF samples collected, microorganisms were detected by PCR in 21 (10%). The rates were 4% in neonates, 14% in pediatric patients, and 18% in adults. By comparison, conventional testing detected a microorganism in only five patients.Virus was detected in 57% of the PCR-positive samples, bacteria in 33%, and fungi in 10%. The vast majority (90%) of patients, however, still received more than one antibiotic for the treatment of the meningitis episode, and there was no difference in the mean number of different antibiotics received or in the cumulative number of days with antibiotic treatment between patients with a microorganism detected in CSF and those without. The authors of the study suggest this could be caused by a lack of clinical treatment guidelines or poor communication of test results to clinicians.The authors conclude that while cost is a limitation to sustained use of such automated diagnostic systems in a country like Ethiopia, the study illustrates how improved diagnostics, together with development of treatment guidelines, could reduce antibiotic use in meningitis patients.Dec 20 BMC Infect Dis study Company submits New Drug Applications to FDA for pneumonia antibioticDrug company Nabriva Therapeutics of Dublin yesterday announced it has submitted two New Drug Applications (NDAs) to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the oral and intravenous (IV) formulations of lefamulin, a first-in-class, semi-synthetic pleuromutilin antibiotic that is designed for treating community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP).”The submission of the lefamulin NDAs marks another major milestone for Nabriva Therapeutics, demonstrating our commitment to develop novel anti-infective agents that address the urgent, unmet medical need faced by patients with serious infections,” said Jennifer Schranz, MD, Nabriva’s chief medical officer, in a company news release. “Lefamulin has the potential to provide a much-needed monotherapy treatment option for adults with CABP in both the hospital and ambulatory care settings.”The company said the two NDAs are supported by two phase 3 clinical trials—known as LEAP 1 and LEAP 2—that evaluated the safety and efficacy of IV and oral lefamulin compared with moxifloxacin in adults with CABP, including the option to switch from IV to oral administration and a short course of oral treatment with lefamulin. “In both LEAP 1 and LEAP 2, lefamulin was demonstrated to be non-inferior to moxifloxacin, and met both the FDA and European Medicines Agency (EMA) primary and secondary efficacy endpoints for the treatment of CABP,” the company said.Lefamulin was also generally well tolerated in the trials. Nabriva plans to submit a marketing authorization application for lefamulin in Europe in the first quarter of 2019.Dec 20 Nabriva news release Study finds link between occasional antibiotic use and resistanceOriginally published by CIDRAP News Dec 19Antibiotic resistance in the United States appears to be more closely linked to occasional antibiotic use by many people rather than heavy use by few people, and resistance to certain antibiotics is higher in areas where they are used more often, according to a comprehensive study yesterday in eLife.US and Canadian experts analyzed 99.8 million outpatient pharmacy antibiotic prescription fills among 108 million unique people (about 20% of the US population) from 2011 through 2014 using the MarketScan database. They noted that, in 2011, 34% of the people took an antibiotic, but 10% of them received 57% of all prescriptions, which is similar to previously published UK data. The distribution varied by population but was similar across all 4 years.The researchers also examined data from 2012 to 2015 from ResistanceOpen, which tracks antibiotic resistance across the country. To correlate antibiotic use for a particular drug with rates of antibiotic resistance against that drug, the researchers looked at 72 pairs of antibiotics and bacteria.The investigators found that the more a particular antibiotic was used, the greater the resistance. For instance, in states that use more quinolones, more infections caused by Escherichia coli tend to be resistant to quinolones.When comparing occasional, low-intensity antibiotic use by many people to intense use by a few people, however, they found that occasional, low-intensity use was more closely associated with rates of resistance.”Our findings suggest that combatting inappropriate antibiotic use among people who don’t take many antibiotics may be just as important, or more important, to fighting resistance than focusing on high-intensity users,” said lead author Scott Olesen, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, in a Harvard news release. “More antibiotic use generally means more antibiotic resistance, but it seems like the number of people taking antibiotics might matter more than the amount they’re taking.”Dec 18 eLife abstractDec 18 Harvard news release VA study: Metronidazole still appropriate for mild C diff in select patientsOriginally published by CIDRAP News Dec 19A study yesterday in Clinical Infectious Diseases suggests metronidazole may be considered for treating initially mild Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) in patients 65 years old or younger.Until recently, metronidazole was recommended as the first-line treatment option for mild-to-moderate CDI, but updated guidelines now recommend vancomycin for initial non-severe CDI. Despite these guidelines, some reports still recommend that metronidazole be considered in certain patients who have mild CDI and a low risk for disease complications. But limited data exist to identify these patients.To answer the question of which patients can still be treated with metronidazole, researchers with the Providence Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center conducted a two-stage analysis in a cohort of veterans from 125 VA centers with a first episode of mild CDI. The first stage was a predictive analysis regarding which patients treated with metronidazole have successful outcomes, and the second stage compared clinical outcomes in patients treated with metronidazole versus those treated with vancomycin.Among 3,656 patients treated with metronidazole, the researchers identified 3,282 patients with success and 374 patients without success. Younger age was the only independent predictor of success, with patients 65 and younger associated with an odds of success 1.63 times higher (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.29 to 2.06) than those over 65. Among 115 propensity-score matched pairs of patients under 65, no significant differences were observed between metronidazole and vancomycin for all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 0.29; 95% CI, 0.06 to 1.38), CDI recurrence (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.26 to 1.49), or treatment failure (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.23 to 1.07).The authors of the study say continued work is needed to investigate which severity criteria are most useful in defining mild disease that can be successfully treated with metronidazole.Dec 18 Clin Infect Dis abstract Study finds substantial declines in children’s outpatient antibiotic useOriginally published by CIDRAP News Dec 17Data from three large health plans shows a substantial decline in outpatient antibiotic use in children from 2010 through 2014, according to a study today in Pediatrics.For the study, researchers analyzed pharmacy claims data from three commercial health plans (Plans A, B, and C) in three different regions of the United States, covering children between 3 months and 18 years of age. The same research team has been monitoring the data since 2000, and a previous study had found that the substantial downward trend in antibiotic use among children since 2000 had begun to plateau by 2009-2010. To determine whether antibiotic use has continued to decline or remain stable, the researchers calculated population-based antibiotic-dispensing rates for the three health plans for each study year from 2000 through 2014.The results showed clear and substantial additional declines in antibiotic use among children in all age groups in the three health plans from 2009-2010 through 2013-2014. Looking at 2000-2001 through 2013-2014, the researchers found overall declines across all three health plans of 40% to 50% among children under the age of 6, who have the highest rates of antibiotic use of any age group. Declines in the range of 20% to 40% were observed in older children and adolescents. Consistent with the findings of the previous studies, antibiotic prescribing rates were markedly lower in Plan B, an integrated delivery health system plan located in the Mountain West.The results also showed that the fraction of antibiotic prescribing associated with diagnoses of viral illnesses decreased in all age groups, and that use of second-generation macrolides and cephalosporins—neither of which are considered first-line treatment for common pediatric infections—declined from 2009-2010 through 2013-2014, after marked increases the decade before.Though they acknowledge that a substantial fraction of antibiotic prescribing in all age groups remains unnecessary and that further reductions are possible, the authors of the study conclude, “We believe that child health professionals can be justifiably proud of the major change in practice that has occurred in outpatient prescribing of antibiotics.”Dec 17 Pediatrics study Study shows C diff spores persist in toilet water and on bathroom surfacesOriginally published by CIDRAP News Dec 17A new study by researchers from the University of Oklahoma College of Public Health suggests that toilets may be a persistent source of environmental C difficile contamination. The findings appear in the American Journal of Infection Control.In the experimental study, the researchers seeded a flushometer-style toilet in a sealed chamber with a non-pathogenic strain of C difficile spores. The toilet was then flushed 24 times, and the researchers collected post-flush bowl water samples to measure C difficile in the toilet water. They also evaluated large droplets on toilet and bathroom surfaces and air samples to measure environmental contamination and the presence of bacteria in aerosol from the toilet plume.The researchers captured C difficile spores in all post-flush water samples in all trials, indicating persistent contamination even after 24 flushes. In addition, C difficile spores detected in large droplets on toilet and bathroom surfaces accumulated over the 24-flush period. Droplet nuclei spore bioaerosol was produced over at least 12 flushes.”These results demonstrate that toilets contaminated with C difficile spores will produce numerous large droplet and droplet nuclei bioaerosols that can contaminate surfaces close to and distant from the source,” the authors of the study write. “Further, the microbial contamination will persist in the bowl water for many flushes after initial contamination and produce bioaerosol with each flush.”The authors say the results have significant implications for public access environments where people shedding C difficile, or other gastrointestinal pathogens, may contaminate a toilet that is subsequently used by other people. Dec 14 Am J Infect Control studylast_img read more

COVID-19 Scan for May 29, 2020

COVID-19 Scan for May 29, 2020

first_imgStudy: 11% of diabetics die within 1 week of hospitalization for COVID-19The first major study of diabetics hospitalized with COVID-19 shows more than 1 in 10 die within 7 days of admission, and about 1 in 5 is intubated within 1 week. The study appears today in Diabetologia.The analysis, named the CORONADO study, was conducted across 53 French hospitals from Mar 10 through 31 and included 1,317 patients diagnosed as having COVID-19 and diabetes.  The vast majority (89%) had type 2 diabetes, and 3% had type 1. Men constituted 69% of the patients. Twenty-nine percent of patients either died (140 patients, 10.6%) or were mechanically ventilated by day 7. Only 18.0% of patients were discharged by day 7.Microvascular and macrovascular diabetic complications were found in 46.8% and 40.8% of cases, respectively, the authors said. Neither long-term glucose control nor current insulin use was found to increase the risk of death. Instead, as in the general population, only age and body mass index (BMI) were associated with worsening outcomes for patients.”BMI was positively and independently associated with the primary outcome, which is largely driven by tracheal intubation,” the authors said. They add that their findings could be reassuring to well-managed type 1 diabetics, as the study found no deaths among type 1 diabetics under the age of 65. May 29 Diabetologia study  New York COVID-19 case series: High kidney injury, death ratesAn analysis of the first 1,000 patients treated for COVID-19 at a large teaching hospital in New York City found that patients had more underlying health conditions, longer intubations, and higher rates of kidney injury compared with similar reports from other countries. New York–based researchers reported their findings—including a 21% death rate—today in BMJ.The authors examined the electronic medical records of patients hospitalized at New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center from Mar 1 to Apr 5. Of the 1,000 patients, 150 came in through the emergency department and 614 were admitted to the hospital, with 236 admitted or transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU).The most common comorbidities were high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity. ICU patients tended to be older and male, with longer stays. Acute kidney injury was seen in 78.0% of ICU patients, with 35.2% needing dialysis. The authors saw a dual pattern with regard to intubation following symptom onset, some at 3 to 4 days and another group at 9 days. As of Apr 30, 211 people (21.1%) had died, and 90 (9.0%) were still in the hospital.The dual pattern for intubation could suggest a biphasic disease course, the researchers wrote, and the renal complication was strikingly higher than other reports, with limited intravenous fluids, toxicity from the disease process, or increased comorbidities as potential contributing factors.The authors said the findings could help guide clinical practice, especially regarding vigilance the development of breathing problems, even after conditions appear to be stabilizing.May 29 BMJ studylast_img read more

Chautauqua Performance Brings Historic Figure To Life At Fuller Lodge Tuesday March 10

Chautauqua Performance Brings Historic Figure To Life At Fuller Lodge Tuesday March 10

first_imgThe Los Alamos Historical Society presents a chautauqua performance by Dr. Evangeline Roybal Sena at 7 p.m., March 10 in Fuller Lodge. Sena will portray Maria Josefa Jaramillo Carson, the third wife of Kit Carson. Courtesy/LAHSLos Alamos Historical Society News:The Los Alamos Historical Society’s lecture series will present a chautauqua performance by Dr. Evangeline Roybal Sena 7 p.m., March 10 in Fuller Lodge.Sena will portray Maria Josefa Jaramillo Carson, the third wife of western legend Kit Carson.Maria Josefa Jaramillo Carson was born in 1828 in a small village north of Santa Fe. She was the great, great granddaughter of early settlers who came to the area from Mexico in 1693 with Don Diego de Vargas when he re-established the colonies after the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. Not long after Maria’s birth, the family moved to Taos where her father became a merchant on the Santa Fe Trail.When Maria Josefa was approaching her 15th birthday, she became the third wife of Kit Carson, the American frontiersman who was a fur trapper, wilderness guide, Indian agent and U.S. Army officer. He was away a great deal of the time, leaving her with hardships and loneliness. Her life is the story of a young Hispanic girl who quickly became a woman and fulfilled her destiny as a faithful wife and mother.Sena grew up on a farm in the San Luis Valley near the town of Blanca, Colo., and earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Adams State College in Alamosa, Colo. Approximately two decades later, she earned a Ph.D. in administration and supervision from the University of Colorado in Boulder. She and her husband, Val, were recently awarded the Premio Hilos Culturales Award for their longtime contribution to the traditional arts of Northern New Mexico and southern Colorado.Better known as Vangie, Sena was drawn to Maria’s story because of their shared Hispanic heritage. Her ancestors, like Maria’s, made the long journey in the same caravan with Don Diego de Vargas in 1693.Dr. Sena’s performance in Fuller Lodge is suitable for families with children. The Los Alamos Historical Society’s Lecture Series is sponsored this year by Robin and Richard McLean.last_img read more

Witkoff and DCD buy £280m Devonshire House

Witkoff and DCD buy £280m Devonshire House

first_imgThe announcement was made this afternoon by the vendor, Land Securities. The sale comes after two failed attempts by the Abu Dhabi Royal Family to buy the 1920s trophy building last year. The 186,472 sq ft (15,619 sq m) landmark building overlooks Green Park in Piccadilly and comprises offices and retail on the ground floor.Tenants include Boston Consulting, Alliance Bernstein and Marks & Spencer. The property provides a total rental income in excess of £11m per annum.Mike Hussey, head of the London Portfolio at Land Securities, said: ‘We have owned Devonshire House since 1955 and during this time Land Securitieshas been able to create very considerable value for our shareholders through theproperty’s refurbishment and subsequent lettings. ‘The proceeds of the sale will be reinvested in other investment and development projects in London, creating new trophies for the Group.’Land Securities was advised by Franc Warwick. Witkoff and DCD Group wereadvised by CBGA.last_img read more

Time to step back from the brink, Mr Brown

Time to step back from the brink, Mr Brown

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Harnessing fusion power: The KSTAR project

Harnessing fusion power: The KSTAR project

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img