Can’t find that rare leopard anywhere? Ask a dung beetle

Can’t find that rare leopard anywhere? Ask a dung beetle

first_imgDung beetles may one day be a conservationist’s best friend. Researchers already consider a healthy and diverse population of these poop-eating insects (pictured) a reliable sign of a healthy mammal population. But entomologists have now demonstrated that the beetles can reliably tell just what species are there as well. Many animals hide very well in their environments and so are hard to inventory. It might seem logical to look for their droppings instead. But animal poop is so rich that it gets quickly carted away and buried and can be as hard to find as the animals themselves. However, the researchers rationalized that mammal poop should contain blood and other cells with DNA inside, and that some of this genetic material should survive intact when eaten. So they trapped airborne dung beetles in a Swaziland savanna by hanging up a transparent sheet and selected one individual from each of 10 species to dissect. Then they removed the insects’ pooped-filled guts and sequenced all the DNA they could find there. Finally, they matched those sequences to those in existing DNA databases to learn where the DNA came from. With just 10 beetles, they showed there were blue wildebeest, zebras, mice, cattle, goats, and even humans living nearby, they report this week on bioRxiv, a preprint archive. This was a proof-of-principle study, the authors say, but dung beetles are easy to find and catch by the hundreds. And because genome sequencing is relatively cheap now, it’s feasible to analyze DNA in large numbers of the beetles, and possibly to detect species—such as the critically endangered small leopard found on the Arabian Peninsula—without ever laying eyes on them.last_img read more

Goats know what their friends sound like

Goats know what their friends sound like

first_img Goats know who their real friends are. A study published today in Royal Society Open Science shows that the animals can recognize what other goats look like and sound like, but only those they are closest with. Up until the late 1960s, the overwhelming assumption was that only humans could mentally keep track of how other individuals look, smell, and sound—what scientists call cross-modal recognition. We now know that many different kinds of animals can do this like horses, lions, crows, dogs, and certain primates. Instead of a lab, these researchers settled into Buttercups Sanctuary for Goats in Boughton Monchelsea, U.K., to find out whether goats had the ability to recognize each other. To do so, they first recorded the calls of individual goats. Then, they set up three pens in the shape of a triangle in the sanctuary’s pasture. Equidistant between the two pens at the base of the triangle was a stereo speaker, camouflaged as to not distract the goat participants. A “watcher” goat stood at the peak of the triangle, and the two remaining corners were filled with the watcher’s “stablemate” (they share a stall at night) and a random herd member. Then, the team would play either the stablemate’s or the random goat’s call over the speaker and time how long it took for the watcher to match the call with the correct goat. They repeated this test again, but with two random goats. The researchers found that the watcher goat would look at the goat that matched the call quickly and for a longer time, but only in the test that included their stablemate. The results indicate that goats are not only capable of cross-modal recognition, but that they might also be able to use inferential reasoning, in other words, process of elimination. Think back to the test: Perhaps when the goat heard a call that it knew was not its pal, it inferred that it must have been the other one. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Goats know what their friends sound like By Rachael LallensackFeb. 14, 2017 , 7:15 PMlast_img read more

Seventeen volunteers let this worm live inside them to help defeat a dangerous disease

Seventeen volunteers let this worm live inside them to help defeat a dangerous disease

first_img At 2:15 p.m., Roestenberg huddles in a small meeting room with three colleagues. The worms are not drugs, but they need to be released for use just like an experimental drug would be. The scientists check numbers on some documents against data on a computer screen, then they sign a form. The experiment can begin.Twenty minutes later, back in the infection room, the volunteers stretch out their arms so that a little metal cylinder, a few centimeters in diameter, can be taped to their skin. Carefully, an assistant pipettes a few drops of water, containing exactly 20 parasites, into each cylinder. The volunteers are nervous, but they say they are motivated. “I like the fact that the study is related to vaccines, because I’ve worked in that field before,” says one, a young scientist. The woman next to him says she comes from East Africa and knows the disease firsthand. They will also be paid €1000 for their time.Once infected, the volunteers will return to the lab every week so the research team can test their blood for a molecule called CAA, which the worms regurgitate from their stomachs. CAA’s presence will indicate that the worms are still alive; in future trials, its absence might mean that a vaccine or drug has worked.Some schistosomiasis scientists agree that the potential benefits justify the minimal risks. “My hope is that it would hugely accelerate identification of worthwhile candidate vaccines,” says Alison Elliott of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, who works at a joint Ugandan and U.K. research unit in Entebbe. She is interested in establishing the model there; people in Uganda, a country badly affected by schistosomiasis, might react differently to a vaccine if they were exposed to the worms in childhood, she explains. At a recent stakeholders’ meeting, “Ethics and regulatory colleagues were very supportive of taking discussions of the model forward, and community representatives are already keen for the opportunity to volunteer!” Elliott added in an email.“It’s itching a little bit,” one of the Leiden volunteers says 5 minutes into the exposure. After half an hour, when the infested water is removed from the volunteers’ forearms, red spots reveal where the parasites have entered their new hosts. Then, close to 4 p.m., the clock stops ticking; the volunteers head home and Roestenberg and her colleagues go out for a coffee. 3 2 By Kai KupferschmidtFeb. 21, 2018 , 4:25 PM At 12:05 p.m. on a Thursday in February, a lab technician takes a six-well plate containing a solitary red snail and places it in a heated water bath under a strong light. The light and warmth signal hundreds of tiny larval parasites to stream out of the mollusk. Now, the clock starts ticking for Meta Roestenberg, an infectious disease physician here at Leiden University Medical Center. She has about 4 hours to launch a unique, controversial experiment in which she will let the parasites burrow into the arms of four healthy volunteers. If she waits too long, the larvae start to die.Roestenberg and her colleagues are infecting people with Schistosoma mansoni, one of five tiny waterborne worm species that cause schistosomiasis, a disease that sickens millions of people in Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America and kills thousands each year. There is no schistosomiasis vaccine and only one old, inadequate drug, praziquantel, to treat it. Infecting humans could help speed up the development of new interventions. Roestenberg has designed the experiment to prevent the parasites from reproducing, and she says the risk to volunteers is extremely low.But not low enough, some scientists argue, because there is no guarantee that subjects will get rid of their parasites when the study is over. “I would not volunteer for this study and if I had a son or daughter who wanted to volunteer, I would recommend against it,” says Daniel Colley, a schistosomiasis researcher at the University of Georgia in Athens.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Worms mature, mate, and lay eggs. Parasites to the people Researchers have long grown Schistosoma mansoni in the lab, using hamsters. Now, they are also infecting humans with the parasitic worms. Larvae emerge from snail. 1 EYE OF SCIENCE/SCIENCE SOURCE 4center_img Male and female larvae are used to infect hamster. 5 In nature, male and female Schistosoma mansoni worms pair up within the host. Studies in which people are purposely infected with malaria, cholera, and flu are on the rise, but they haven’t been done with schistosomiasis, in part because damage from the S. mansoni eggs can be irreversible. The goal of the current study, which began in early 2017, is to find out whether Roestenberg’s infection model is safe; if so, she hopes to test a vaccine later this year.At 1:35 p.m., Roestenberg walks to the room where the volunteers will be infected. She opens a transparent plastic container that contains epinephrine, antihistamines, and corticosteroids. “This is the emergency box,” she says—in case a subject has a strong allergic reaction. None of the 13 volunteers infected so far has, although one who was infected with 30 larvae developed a strong fever. In another precaution, the volunteers have been tested to rule out risk factors such as HIV infection and pregnancy. In nature, people become infected with both male and female parasites, but Roestenberg uses only males, so there will be no eggs and thus, she says, no symptoms. And when the study ends in 12 weeks, the volunteers will be given praziquantel to cure them.That drug, Colley emphasizes, is “not terribly effective.” But Roestenberg says that even if it fails, volunteers needn’t worry. “The ethics board asked me: ‘If one worm survives even after multiple treatments, what will happen to that person?’ And I said: ‘They’ll probably live to be 100.’” The board gave her its blessing. Colley agrees the risk is low, but still, S. mansoni has an average life span of 5 to 10 years. “That is a long time to have something as ugly as a schistosome living in your blood vessels, putting out excrement and things.” At 1:05 p.m., the technician takes the plate out of the bath. The larvae are ready to be harvested. Viewed under a microscope, they move around frantically, like minipropellers. Another technician removes one drop, dilutes it, adds iodine to kill the parasites, and counts them. That allows the researchers to calculate how many are left in the well: 574. They need only 80 today, 20 per volunteer.A snail population in an African lake could shed millions of these larvae into the water on a single day, each equipped with a chemical sensor that lets it home in on humans entering the water. After penetrating the skin, they migrate to the liver, where they mature and mate. Male-female couples stay together and move to blood vessels in the bowel, where they can reside for years, shedding hundreds of eggs a day. Most eggs end up in urine and feces, and if they make their way back into the lake they may infect fresh snails. But some get trapped in the liver, kidneys, or spleen, causing damage and leading to pain, blood loss, malnutrition, and sometimes death.Researchers in this same lab recreated the parasite’s life cycle decades ago, with hamsters taking the place of humans. That allowed them to produce and study S. mansoni. Now, Roestenberg wants to bring humans back into the mix. Field trials, especially of vaccines, are hugely expensive and complex, and the risk of failure is considerable. A controlled infection study can act as a gatekeeper, she says: “It gives you an indication whether something can work in humans or not.”  Male larvae are allowed to burrow into arm ofvolunteer. N. DESAI/SCIENCE Eggs are harvested from liver and used to infect snails. Seventeen volunteers let this worm live inside them to help defeat a dangerous diseaselast_img read more

Sexual harassment isn’t just about sex: Groundbreaking report details persistent hostility female scientists face

Sexual harassment isn’t just about sex: Groundbreaking report details persistent hostility female scientists face

first_img Sexual harassment isn’t just about sex: Groundbreaking report details persistent hostility female scientists face Many women in science face sexual harassment that impedes their careers. Robert Neubecker Ask someone for an example of sexual harassment and they might cite a professor’s insistent requests to a grad student for sex. But such lurid incidents account for only a small portion of a serious and widespread harassment problem in science, according to a report released this week by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Two years in the making, the report describes pervasive and damaging “gender harassment”—behaviors that belittle women and make them feel they don’t belong, including sexist comments and demeaning jokes. Between 17% and 50% of female science and medical students reported this kind of harassment in large surveys conducted by two major university systems across 36 campuses.“We are trying to bring to the fore the concept of gender harassment,” says anthropologist Kate Clancy of the University of Illinois in Urbana, an author of the report. “The vast majority of sexual harassment that occurs is sexist hostility and crude behavior. And the literature supports that these everyday experiences may have as bad or worse personal and professional consequences as things like unwanted sexual advances.”Decades of failure to curb sexual harassment, despite civil rights laws that make it illegal, underscore the need for a change in culture, the report says. “We have been addressing this problem for a long time. And we have not made progress,” said cardiologist Paula Johnson, president of Wellesley College in Massachusetts and co-chair of the committee that wrote the report. “The legal system alone is really just not adequate for addressing the issues.” The authors suggest universities take measures to clearly report the number of harassment complaints they receive and investigations they conduct, use committee-based advising to prevent students from being in the power of a single harasser, and institute alternative, less formal ways for targets to report complaints if they don’t wish to start an official investigation.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The report, Sexual Harassment of Women: Climate, Culture, and Consequences in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, noted that many surveys fail to rigorously evaluate sexual harassment. It used data from large surveys done at two major research universities—the University of Texas system and the Pennsylvania State University system—to describe kinds of sexual harassment directed at students by faculty and staff. The most common was “sexist hostility,” such as demeaning jokes or comments that women are not smart enough to succeed in science, reported by 25% of female engineering students and 50% of female medical students in the Texas system. The incidence of female students experiencing unwanted sexual attention or sexual coercion was lower, ranging in both Texas and Pennsylvania between 2% and 5% for the former and about 1% for the latter. But the report declares that a hostile environment—even if it consists “more of putdowns than come-ons,” as Johnson puts it—makes unwanted sexual attention and coercion more likely.The report says women in science, engineering, or medicine who are harassed may abandon leadership opportunities to dodge perpetrators, leave their institutions, or leave science altogether. It also highlights the ineffectiveness of ubiquitous, online sexual harassment training and notes what is likely massive underreporting of sexual harassment by women who justifiably fear retaliation. To retain the talents of women in science, the authors write, will require true cultural change rather than “symbolic compliance” with civil rights laws. By Meredith WadmanJun. 12, 2018 , 11:00 AMlast_img read more

Does ‘supportive housing’ help the homeless with medical needs? Not clear, study says

Does ‘supportive housing’ help the homeless with medical needs? Not clear, study says

first_img Does ‘supportive housing’ help the homeless with medical needs? Not clear, study says Ted S. Warren/AP Photo By Victoria DavisJul. 16, 2018 , 4:00 PM PSH was designed to address such “housing sensitive conditions” as ensuring that diabetics have a refrigerator to keep their insulin or that cancer patients receiving chemotherapy have ready access to a bathroom. The committee, which issued its report on 11 July, cited studies showing that PSH is effective in serving the medical needs of those with HIV/AIDS. However, it says similar evidence doesn’t exist for other conditions. In fact, Kizer and his colleagues were sorely disturbed by the spotty state of the research.“The committee was disappointed to find that the existing literature lacks information on the type, intensity, frequency, or length of the needed services,” they write. “The lack of data about these things effectively precluded generalizing to who among individuals experiencing homelessness are most likely to benefit from the services and different models of PSH.”center_img A new report finds no evidence that efforts to provide support for the chronically homeless improve their health or reduce the cost of their care. But that doesn’t mean the U.S. government should stop funding programs that offer permanent supportive housing (PSH), say the authors of the study, conducted by a panel convened by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Instead, the report calls for more analyses of what types of interventions work best for which populations.“As a former clinician and public health official it would seem logical, if not obvious, that if you can keep people safe with housing they should have better health outcomes,” says the report’s chair, Kenneth Kizer, who leads the Institute for Population Health Improvement at the University of California, Davis. “Indeed, one of our recommendations is that we need to increase the supply of permanent supportive housing.”The chronically homeless represent less than 20% of the 550,000 homeless people in the United States. But that group tends to require more social and medical services than those with even occasional access to safe and stable housing environments do.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) A new report questions the impact of support services that go beyond providing stable, safe shelter for the homeless.last_img read more

With Democrats in control of U.S. House, science panel gets fresh start

With Democrats in control of U.S. House, science panel gets fresh start

first_img TrainingNameState TrainingBiochemical engineerNameSean CastenStateIllinois TrainingOcean engineer NameJoe CunninghamStateSouth Carolina TrainingIndustrial engineer NameChrissy HoulahanStatePennsylvania TrainingNuclear engineer NameElaine LuriaStateVirginia TrainingPediatricianNameKim SchrierStateWashington TrainingNurseNameLauren UnderwoodStateIllinois TrainingDentistNameJeff Van DrewStateNew Jersey AP PHOTO/Elaine Thompson Related Kim Schrier, a pediatrician, played up her technical training in a winning congressional campaign. The results of last week’s divisive midterm elections, with Democrats reclaiming control of the U.S. House of Representatives and Republicans likely strengthening their hold on the Senate, have allowed both parties to claim victory. U.S. scientists are also experiencing mixed emotions.Many are pleased with what they expect to be a more data-driven approach to science policy under the new Democratic chair of the House science committee. But they also face the sobering reality that, by Science’s count, only seven of the 49 House candidates with technical backgrounds were victorious. And environmental activists are chagrined by the defeat of a proposed tax on carbon emissions in Washington and an Arizona initiative to increase that state’s reliance on renewable energy, although Nevada voters took a first step toward adopting a similar policy.In the House, Democrats picked up nearly 40 seats. That outcome gives them control of the 435-seat body for the first time since 2010, meaning they will appoint committee chairs and decide which bills get a vote.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson (D–TX) is in line to replace the retiring Representative Lamar Smith (R–TX) as chair of the science committee. The two Texans represent a stark contrast. Trained as a psychiatric nurse, Johnson has promised to “restore the credibility” of a committee that for 6 years has challenged the findings of climate scientists and questioned the need for many environmental regulations.“We were not really following our charter [under Smith],” says Johnson, who joined the panel as a new legislator in 1993 and for the past 8 years has been its top Democrat. Instead, she says, “We were trying to uncover any information that would undercut scientific findings and avoid facing what the scientific data were showing us.”Smith, a lawyer who came to Congress in 1989, regularly convened hearings designed to highlight the views of those opposed to federal action to curb greenhouse gas emissions. He also used his unilateral power to issue investigative subpoenas—an authority traditionally given to just a few committee heads—to attack climate science he found suspect. Johnson hopes to shift the debate from “ignoring what’s happening” to discussing “what we should be doing to save our planet and the lives and money it takes to clean up after weather-related disasters.” With Democrats in control of U.S. House, science panel gets fresh startcenter_img Science restored: Eddie Bernice Johnson prepares to chair key panel in U.S. House of Representatives “I don’t know enough at this point about what the science committee does to have an opinion,” says Representative-elect Sean Casten (D–IL), a biochemical engineer who founded a company that helps firms become more energy efficient and who defeated Representative Peter Roskam (R) in a suburban Chicago district. “While I worked in basic science for half a dozen years in my youth, I feel more confident in my ability to deploy and apply basic science than to create it. So committees that deal with infrastructure and financial services, energy, and environmental policy are closer to areas where I can apply my skills.”Representative-elect Lauren Underwood (D), who ousted Representative Randy Hultgren (R) in a north-central Illinois district, hopes to apply her background as a nurse and health care analyst to win a seat on one of two panels that oversee federal health care policy. That’s also true for Representative-elect Kim Schrier (D–WA), a pediatrician who won an open seat outside of Seattle.“Health care is where people are really hurting now,” Schrier says. “I felt I could really lend my expertise to finding better ways of providing it that bring costs down and improve outcomes. … I’m also really excited to be the only woman doctor in Congress at a time when women’s reproductive rights are being attacked.”Representative-elect Chrissy Houlahan (D–PA), who won an open seat in the Philadelphia suburbs, says her training as an industrial engineer is just one of many facets of her identity. “I’m a veteran, an entrepreneur, a mom, and an educator as well,” says Houlahan, who helped her husband grow a sports apparel company and briefly taught high school chemistry before leading a foundation that promotes early literacy. “I feel that I am part of a wave of people elected who provide diversity on a lot of levels.”Climate change is an existential issue for two new members representing coastal districts. In South Carolina, Representative-elect Joe Cunningham (D), an ocean engineer turned environmental lawyer, hammered his opponent for voicing support of President Donald Trump’s plan to lift a ban on offshore drilling along the Atlantic coast, a pivotal issue for his constituents.Representative-elect Elaine Luria (D–VA) says her 20-year career in the Navy helps her understand both the civilian and military components of sea-level rise. And she thinks the public is already on board. “People see our roads flooding and the sea level rising,” she says about her southeastern Virginia district. “I have yet to talk to anyone who doesn’t think climate change is real.”Before these new members can take their seats in January 2019, the current class of legislators must finish work on a spending bill for the 2019 fiscal year that began on 1 October. An earlier agreement to increase overall spending in 2018 and 2019 allowed Congress to pass budgets for about two-thirds of the government, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Department of Energy. But budgets for the remaining agencies, including NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and several science agencies within the Department of Commerce, have been frozen under a continuing resolution that expires on 7 December. Disagreement over Trump’s request to build a wall between the United States and Mexico stands in the way of a final deal by the lame-duck Congress.The annual battle over spending could intensify next year. The divided Congress will have to deal with a 2011 law aimed at reducing the federal deficit over a decade. That law imposes spending caps, and could force lawmakers to cut a combined $126 billion from civilian and military budgets unless the Democratic House and Republican-controlled Senate can broker a deal to raise the caps.Some legislators long associated with science issues won’t be around for those debates. Senator Bill Nelson (D–FL), a NASA enthusiast who once flew aboard the space shuttle, appears to have lost his bid for reelection. In the House, the losers included Representative John Culberson (R–TX), who chairs a House appropriations subcommittee that sets spending levels for several science agencies, including NASA and NSF, and has pushed for NASA to develop a mission to Jupiter’s moon Europa. The science committee will lose Hultgren, a cheerleader for basic energy research, as well as Representative Barbara Comstock (R–VA), who chairs the research subcommittee, and Representative Dana Rohrabacher (R–CA), a persistent doubter of climate science.The frontrunner to take Culberson’s spending gavel is Representative José Serrano (D–NY), an advocate for science with a special interest in the Census Bureau. Representative Nita Lowey (D–NY) is poised to lead the full appropriations committee, and Representative Rosa DeLauro (D–CT) is the favorite to lead the subcommittee that oversees NIH. Both have been supportive of federal investments in research.Meanwhile, some science candidates who didn’t win last week see a silver lining. Randy Wadkins, a professor of biochemistry at The University of Mississippi in Oxford, was the only academic scientist to make it onto the general election ballot. And although he lost by a two-to-one margin to an incumbent Republican, he says his campaign “might have been the most important thing I’ve ever done in my life, science-wise.”Seeking a House seat gave him a platform to connect with people “who were interested in science and wanted to do something,” he says. “A lot of us lost. But some of us won. And that’s my take-home message: This isn’t the end of scientists running for Congress; it’s just the beginning.” The new STEM Democrats Seven candidates with science backgrounds won seats last week in the U.S. House of Representatives. That move and other changes in tone could help repair a breach between the panel and the scientific community. “Stakeholders have told me they stopped asking for meetings [with the Republican majority] because they didn’t see the point,” says one Democratic staffer. “That’s going to change, because we will be listening.”All seven winners with technical backgrounds are Democrats, and six were first-time candidates. Two toppled Republican incumbents; the rest won open seats. Four are women—a pediatrician, a nurse, an industrial engineer, and a retired U.S. Navy commander—helping boost overall female representation in the House to nearly 25%.Newly elected lawmakers rarely get appointed to the appropriations committee and other panels with influence over key sectors of the economy, such as tax and fiscal policy. Accordingly, they are often overrepresented on the science committee. But none of the soon-to-be House members with technical backgrounds is lobbying for a spot on the science panel. By Jeffrey MervisNov. 13, 2018 , 4:10 PMlast_img read more

Closest-known ancestor of today’s Native Americans found in Siberia

Closest-known ancestor of today’s Native Americans found in Siberia

first_img Martin Sikora The results are exciting, if a bit unsurprising, says Connie Mulligan, an anthropologist at the University of Florida in Gainesville. “To me, it makes total sense that there were a lot of populations migrating through the region and replacing each other, with some of them moving into the Americas.”In the second study, led by biologist Pavel Flegontov at the University of Ostrava in the Czech Republic and also appearing today in Nature, Potter and colleagues attempt to uncover the roots of a genetic family known to scientists as Paleo-Eskimos (although this term is disputed by Indigenous groups themselves). Archaeological records suggest the ancestors of these individuals moved into modern-day Alaska and the Canadian Arctic about 5000 years ago, but how they relate to modern groups remains a mystery.The scientists analyzed the genomes of 48 ancient individuals from sites in the North American Arctic and Siberia dating from between about 7000 to 300 years ago. They then compared their DNA to those of other modern and ancient Indigenous people across northern North America and looked for patterns in shared ancestry and language families.Paleo-Eskimos originating in Siberia crossed Beringia about 5000 years ago, mixing with indigenous Americans from a previous wave of Siberian migrants, as well as a much later lineage called Neo-Eskimos, the team concludes. This tangled family tree underpins the ancestry of modern speakers of indigenous Na-Dene and Eskimo-Aleut languages.Based on the DNA analysis, the group that gave rise to Kolyma1 identified by Willerslev’s team may be the ancestors, or very close relations, of the Paleo-Eskimos. “[They are] in the right spot to be ancestors, or related in some way, to the Paleo-Eskimos that expanded into North America around 5000 years ago,” Potter says. “It fits together really nicely.” Indigenous Americans, who include Alaska Natives, Canadian First Nations, and Native Americans, descend from humans who crossed an ancient land bridge connecting Siberia in Russia to Alaska tens of thousands of years ago. But scientists are unclear when and where these early migrants moved from place to place. Two new studies shed light on this mystery and uncover the most closely related Native American ancestor outside North America.In the first study, researchers led by Eske Willerslev, a geneticist at the University of Copenhagen, sequenced the whole genomes of 34 individuals who lived in Siberia, the land bridge Beringia, and Alaska from 600 to nearly 32,000 years ago. The oldest individuals in the sample—two men who lived in far northern Siberia—represent the earliest known humans from that part of the world. There are no direct genetic traces of these men in any of the other groups the team surveyed, suggesting their culture likely died out about 23,000 years ago when the region became too cold to be inhabitable.Elsewhere on the Eurasian continent, however, a group arose that would eventually move into Siberia, splinter, and cross Beringia into North America, the DNA analysis reveals. A woman known as Kolyma1, who lived in northeastern Siberia about 10,000 years ago, shares about two-thirds of her genome with living Native Americans. “It’s the closest we have ever gotten to a Native American ancestor outside the Americas,” Willerslev says. Still, notes Ben Potter, an archaeologist at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks who was not involved with the work, the relation is nevertheless distant.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Based on the time it would have taken for key mutations to pop up, the ancestors of today’s Native Americans splintered off from these ancient Siberians about 24,000 years ago, roughly matching up with previous archaeological and genetic evidence for when the peopling of the Americas occurred, the team reports today in Nature.Additional DNA evidence suggests a third wave of migrants, the Neo-Siberians, moved into northeastern Siberia from the south sometime after 10,000 years ago. These migrants mixed with the ancient Siberians, planting the genetic roots of many of the area’s present-day populations. Elena Pavlova Closest-known ancestor of today’s Native Americans found in Siberiacenter_img Different groups have mixed and migrated throughout Siberia in Russia and into North America over the past 40,000 years. By Michael PriceJun. 5, 2019 , 1:00 PM Two men found at the Yana Rhinoceros Horn Site in northern Siberia in Russia date to about 32,000 years ago, providing the earliest direct evidence of humans in the region.last_img read more

Belotti: ‘Toro behind Mazzarri’

Belotti: ‘Toro behind Mazzarri’

first_img Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/ Andrea Belotti insists the Torino players are firmly behind coach Walter Mazzarri as “we showed this team are still alive” against Juventus. Another derby defeat to the Old Lady at the Grande Torino has put Mazzarri under pressure and the Granata are still without a win in Serie A since the 2-1 victory over Milan in late September. Despite that, Belotti reassured his boss he still had the full support of the club’s dressing room to come through this difficult spell. “We confronted ourselves and some of us have let out what we kept inside,” the striker told Corriere Torino. “After speaking about it, we have understood and got to know each other better. We have released ourselves from bad thoughts and, against Juventus, we showed this team are still alive. “The whole squad are still behind Mazzarri, we always have been. And on the pitch against Juventus, we demonstrated this.” Torino desperately need to bounce back this weekend against Brescia, given they are just four points off the teams inside the relegation zone.last_img read more

City updates

City updates

first_imgWhat’s new in the big cities.LondonExhibition: Head to London’s National Gallery (Trafalgar Square; Tel: 020 7747 2885) to see the largest ever exhibition of Leonardo da Vinci’s surviving paintings. The display concentrates on da Vinci’s career as a court painter in Milan. Till February 5.Restaurant revamp: Celebrating its 50th year, a new-look Rib Room Bar & Restaurant (Jumeirah Carlton Tower, Cadogan Place; Tel: 020 7858 7250) is back with a pricey menu where modern British dishes sit alongside classic chophouse fare. The wine list comes on iPads, and there’s a comfy bar with snacks and a big focus on cocktails. Theatre: Celebrated comedy film The Ladykillers has been adapted into a hilarious and thrilling new play, which opens at Gielgud Theatre (Shaftesbury Avenue; Tel: 020 7907 7071) on November 26. Till February 12.Dance: Watch dancers from Taiwan’s Cloud Gate Dance Theatre, a contemporary dance group, take the stage at Sadler’s Wells (Rosebery Avenue; Tel: 0844 412 4300). Their new act is called White, divided into three parts, each presenting a different type of white. From: November 9 to 12.New yorkParade: Witness New York City’s holiday season officially kick off at 85th Annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade on November 24. It begins at on 77th Street and Central Park West. Expect thousands of soaring balloons, colourful floats and of course the Santa Claus. Route map on www.macys.com/parade New menu: Eric Ripert’s Le Bernardin (155 W 51st Street; 212 554 1515), the Top Rated restaurant in the Zagat 2012 New York City Restaurants Survey, has added a new lounge area where you can enjoy a more casual a la carte selection for lunch. And by more casual, we mean you don’t have to have a reservation and gents don’t have to wear jackets.Ballet: The New York City Ballet production of George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker features marching toy soldiers, a gigantic Christmas tree, crystalline snowflakes and some of the most glorious dancing. From November 25 to December 31; tickets start at US$ 29 (www.nycballet.com).Train show: Watch more than 100 model trains zip through more than 100 replicas of NYC landmarks–Brooklyn Bridge, Yankee Stadium and Washington Bridge–at the New York Botanical Garden (Bronx; tel: 718 817 8700) The set is made from natural supplies such as orange slices, cinnamon sticks, bark and pinecones. From November 19 to January 16.ParisChinese restaurant: Feast on the flavours of Canton at the newly-opened Shang Palace at Shangri-La Hotel (10 avenue d’Iena; Tel: 01 5367 1992). The menu has dishes with interesting names like Buddha Jumping Over the Wall and Beggar’s Chicken. The decor is all feng shui.Sandwich bar: Called The Club (rue Surcouf; tel: 01 4550 3154), this new Left Bank venture owes its name to the nine different ways it makes the club sandwich. From king crab to foie gras, roast beef to vegetables, all nine sandwiches come with delicious fillings. The drinks menu has fresh detox juices (carrot and ginger, for example) and the absolute must-have is the cheesecake. Nightclub: The newest nightclub in town is David Lynch’s Silencio (142 rue Montmartre). And it’s not just a nightclub; Silencio hosts live gigs, DJs and other performances; there are films, old and new, in the 24-seat theatre, plus food tastings and a concierge service.Exhibition: Beauty, Morals and Voluptuousness in the England of Oscar Wilde–this exhibition at Musee D’orsay (1 rue de Legion d’Honneur) brings to Paris the works of Oscar Wilde, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Edward Burne-Jones, William Morris and Aubrey Beardsley. Till January 15.KolkataSpa: Sohum Spa, a chain of wellness spas based in Mumbai, opened its doors to Calcutta at Kenilworth Hotel (Little Russell Street; Tel: 2282 3939). The three-room spa set-up is relaxing in dark wood and white. There are more than 30 therapies on the menu. The Sohum Signature Massage integrates a sports massage with Thai acu-pressure techniques.Vegetarian hotel: Bang in the middle of one of the city’s busiest stretches stands a swanky new hotel, Casa Fortuna (234/1, AJC Bose Road; Tel: 4021 8000), which is also Kolkata’s first vegetarian boutique property. Casa Kitchen, the multi-cuisine bar-restaurant, serves a variety of cuisine ranging from kebabs, Chinese and Continental.Store opening: The swanky 600 sq ft Tommy Hilfiger store at Forum Courtyard (Elgin Road) is done up with traditional maple wood panelling, Ithaca-striped wallpaper and peppy blue tones. The fall-winter collection, currently on display, finds its inspiration from the neighbourhoods and towns of New York. Restaurant: More news for vegetarians. Cream Centre, another Mumbai’s chain, has upped shutters in Kolkata. The 3,500 sq ft restaurant (1 Allenby Road, the lane opposite Forum on Elgin Road) is divided into three sections, with open seating dominating the centre and booth-like alcoves on one side, built to fit in with the thick pillars of the old building.MumbaiWellness: Leading French beauty brand, L’occitane en Provence, opened its first Mumbai store at The Palladium Mall (Phoenix Mills Compound, Lower Parel). The store is spread over 400 sq ft. Restaurant: Just the name Oye Kake (13, Cawasji Patel Street, near Yazdani Bakery, Fort; tel: 2287 1882) tells you which part of India is on the menu of this new colourful restaurant. But there’s no Butter Chicken from Punjab, this place proudly proclaims its pure-veg status. So forget the chicken leg and go for the simple yet delicious Sarson da Saag and Makki di Roti.Airport shop: The Eternal Gandhi souvenir shop is located inside the departure lounge of the international airport, and stocks around 50 Bapu-inspired products. The list is exhaustive. There’s ceramic Gandhi statues, wristwatches, T-shirts, mugs, statues of the iconic three monkeys, khadi shirts, bookmarks, magnets, notepads, calendars, paperweights, key chains and pens. Home store: Newcomer Shaastra (Waterfield Road, Bandra West; tel: 2643 2303) has railway clocks, wind up telephones and antique locks among other standard knick-knacks and accessories.Gwalior with Ayaan Ali KhanThe city: Though I have visited many ‘happening’ cities, the place I like returning to is Gwalior, where my forefathers settled in after they migrated from Central Asia. It is indeed the music capital of India. It was home to Tansen. You must visit the Tansen Tomb in Gwalior. Our ancestral home has been converted into a museum called Sarod Ghar. So anyone with a love for music and history would have a great time visiting the museum. Favourite hotel: For the stay, I recommend the fabulous Usha Kiran Palace in Gwalior. Originally a part of the Gwalior Palace that belongs to the Scindia’s, it is now one of India’s best hotels. From the food to the architecture, it is an absolute winner. It also offers great views of the city from its pavilions. So even if you are not staying at the hotel, do spend an evening at Usha Kiran Palace and enjoy the panoramic views. The mood: Gwalior also has an interesting city centre. It has malls, restaurants and cafes, all things modern… Yet there is an old-world charm because the city is very proud of its past.advertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

Lokpal Bill fiasco: BJP delegation meets President, urges to reconvene Parliament session

Lokpal Bill fiasco: BJP delegation meets President, urges to reconvene Parliament session

first_imgA delegation of senior BJP leaders submitted a memorandum to President Pratibha Patil on Thursday demanding reconvening of Parliament session to facilitate voting on Lokpal Bill.The BJP leaders’ meeting with the President comes exactly a week after the Rajya Sabha Chairman, Vice-President Hamid Ansari, adjourned the House sine die without voting on the controversial Lokpal Bill amidst repeated disruption even as the debate over it was yet to be over.After the midnight drama in the Rajya Sabha on the last day of the extended winter session, the BJP leaders met the President to protest the manner in which the session ended without voting over the Bill.Veteran leader L.K. Advani, who headed the delegation, said after the meeting: “We expect intervention from the President on what had happened in the Rajya Sabha during the Lokpal debate.”The Leader of Opposition in the Rajya Sabha, Arun Jaitley, said, “There has been subversion of parliamentary institution. For the first time the government used a contrived disturbance to stop the Bill being put to vote. The President should suggest some ways to ensure that parliamentary norms are not diluted. The government should convene another session and ensure that voting takes place.””When such a breakdown of constitutional machinery takes place, the President must act as the protector of Constitution. The President could advise the government to reconvene the session and immediately take a vote,” Jaitley said.He had earlier termed the uproar in the Rajya Sabha on the last day of its winter session as “flee-dom at midnight” and said it was a murder of democracy.The BJP delegation comprised party president Nitin Gadkari, Leader of Opposition in the Lok Sabha Sushma Swaraj and various other top leaders. The party has also been planning a weeklong agitation across the country over the issue.- With Headlines Today inputsadvertisementlast_img read more

73 killed in Egypt football match riot

73 killed in Egypt football match riot

first_imgAt least 73 people died on Wednesday when a riot broke out after a football match at a stadium in eastern Egypt, the state-run media reported.The riot erupted in Port Said city after the home team el-Masry beat popular el-Ahly team three to one in an Egyptian Premier League match.The fans of the rival teams started pelting stones at each other amid weak presence of security force, Xinhua quoted the official Nile TV as saying. Hundreds of people were injured.Chief of Egypt’s ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces Hussein Tantawi ordered two military planes to fly to the riot scene for airlifting the players, fans and the injured.Egyptian parliament will hold an emergency session Thursday over the clash.Following the riot, a big fire erupted in the stadium where another match between Zamalik and Ismaily teams was cancelled because of the riot.Egyptian Prosecutor General Abdel Maguid Mahmoud has ordered an investigation into the riot.last_img read more

Sachin Tendulkar gets honorary life membership of SCG

Sachin Tendulkar gets honorary life membership of SCG

first_imgIconic Indian batsman Sachin Tendulkar on Sunday became the first overseas player to be presented with the honorary life membership of the Sydney Cricket Ground here.Presenting the award, New South Wales premier Barry O’Farrell said, “Sachin is one of the greatest cricketers ever and it’s only appropriate we honour him with life membership of one of the world’s greatest cricket grounds.Praising Tendulkar for his sportsmanship and deference for the history of the game, O’Farrell remarked, “The batting legend has said the SCG is his favourite ground outside of India and it’s no wonder when you look at his record at this ground.””Sachin has provided crowds with wonderful memories at the SCG. He averages an amazing 157 in Tests; headed by his magnificent double century in 2004 Test. Always a crowd favourite, Sachin has often received support akin to Australian legends of the game. “Many in the crowd today will be willing him towards his much-vaunted 100th hundred. Regardless of how many runs today, I’m certain the Sydney crowd will pay appropriate tribute to this legend of the game in which is almost certain to be his last match at the SCG,” he added.SCG Trust chairman Rodney Cavalier said the honorary membership was in recognition of Tendulkar’s immense contribution to cricket at the SCG.”The Trust does not award honorary membership lightly. Sachin is the first overseas player in any sport and only the second cricketer to be handed the honour,” said Cavalier.”Cricket fans have been treated to many splendid innings by Sachin at the SCG, including his innings of 241 in 2004 where he shared a magnificent stand of 353 with VVS Laxman.advertisement”Sachin has conducted himself with grace and dignity throughout his career. I’m sure all members and cricket fans would welcome him back to the SCG at any time.”At this ground, Tendulkar has scored 785 runs from five Tests at an average of 157.00 while in one-day internationals, he has made 301 from seven matches at 60.20.last_img read more

Team ‘enjoyed’ talk of rift says Mahendra Singh Dhoni

Team ‘enjoyed’ talk of rift says Mahendra Singh Dhoni

first_imgWhile the entire nation was fretting over the discordant notes emanating from two senior India players over the week in Brisbane, the Indian dressing room was having a good time discussing the reports of fissures in the team, according to skipper Mahendra Singh Dhoni.The controversy surrounding Dhoni first saying the seniors are too slow and can’t be played together, followed by vice-captain Virender Sehwag saying the seniors were rotated to give a chance to youngsters, snowballed into a massive issue. But Dhoni said that all was well with the team and no discussion took place over it.”Well, it (the spirit within the team) is perfect. I don’t know where it (controversy) came from. You have the press conference on tape. It will be interesting if you watch the whole press conference. You will get the answer yourself – what exactly I said and what I meant,” Dhoni explained.”If there is no problem, then why do we need to solve it? It (communication) has always been there. It is not this series or the previous series. It has been perfect and we actually enjoy it when things like this happen. It’s the talk of the dressing room. We try to get the positives out of it. It’s half an hour of good talk in the dressing room, because that’s the best we can get out of it.”When asked if he had a talk with the senior players to clear the air about how the dressing room situation was being perceived back home, Dhoni said that there was no need to give or seek any explanation. “We don’t need to clarify. We all have belief in each other, as to what was said and what happened. It’s not the first time such a thing has happened. What’s the best thing? Get the most out of it. What’s the most? Have fun,” he said.advertisementBut he did concede that the last few days had been a bit awkward, even though the team morale was not down. “You feel a bit awkward initially. You may feel that maybe the person is believing what is being said, and the second person thinks ‘maybe he said it’. Once you get through the talks, it gets back to as smooth as it was. It doesn’t affect the performance or dressing-room atmosphere,” Dhoni said.At the 2009 World Twenty20 in England, Dhoni had paraded the entire team at a press conference to show that the team was united after reports of a rift. On Saturday, the skipper said he had grown wiser since that incident.”It was not projected in a nice way. What I thought was there were 15 players and it would be really nice to ask: ‘Okay, A is fighting with B, okay so both of them are standing here. Ask that player what is the reason’. It was not projected in that way. I said: ‘Leave it. What’s the point fuelling something that’s not there’.”last_img read more

IPL 2012 Live: DC vs KXIP cricket scores and commentary

IPL 2012 Live: DC vs KXIP cricket scores and commentary

first_imgIt has been a clinical performance by Kings XI Punjab against Deccan Chargers at the at Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium in Uppal. Score | Photos With this win, KXIP move into the top 4 of the points table. Undoubtedly the two wickets that Hussey took was the turning point of the game. In that over, he dismissed the well set Harris and the in form White. Deccan never recovered from those blows and could manage only 145. A big win for Punjab, that will help their net run rate. Things are hotting up now, 7 teams in the fray for the 4 play off spots. IPL 2012 – DC vs KXIP Live: KXIP win by 25 runsPreity zinta tweets: Yeah! Finally the Red Lions roared in Hyderabad ! Phew !!! Am so proud of the #KXIP boyz ! Good job with the bat, ball & in the field!KXIP 170/5 in 20 overs (Mandeep Singh 75) beat DC 145/8 in 20 overs (Dan Harris 30; Praveen Kumar 2-15)Marsh: It was a great win. Last game was disappointing and we needed to come back. We knew that if we bowled and fielded well, we could defend it. We need to get a few more wins at home. We have shown good character while winning away from home. Hopefully Gilly gets back soon. The points table is really tight now. We need to play well at the business end of the IPL now.19.6 overs: Azhar Mahmood to Amit Mishra, 1 run, short of length delivery on middle, Amit Mishra pulls it to short midwicket for a single. PUNJAB WIN! advertisement19.5 overs: Azhar Mahmood to Amit Mishra, FOUR, Theron hugs Amit Mishra for that shot. Full and on middle, Amit Mishra clears his front leg and drives it through the cover region for a boundary. Juan Theron, right handed bat, comes to the crease 11:10 pm | 17.2 overs: WICKET! Praveen Kumar to Jhunjunwala, out Jhunjunwala Run Out!! Full toss on middle, Jhunjunwala came down the track and played it to mid off. It should have been an easy single, but he ambled in towards the non striker end. An alert Marsh sent in a direct hit and Jhunjunwala was found napping. Jhunjunwala run out (Shaun Marsh) 19(20) [6s-1] (130/8 in 17.2 overs)Ashish Reddy, right handed bat, comes to the crease 11:05 pm | 16.3 overs: WICKET! Chawla to Akshath Reddy, out Stumped!! Reddy was batting well, but he had to go for it. Short and outside off, it was darted in, Akshath Reddy came down the track again and missed it. Saini took off the bails in a flash and Reddy was well short. Deccan lose another wicket. Akshath Reddy st Saini b Chawla 24(13) [4s-2 6s-1] (121/7 in 16.3 overs)Abhishek Jhunjunwala, right handed bat, comes to the crease 10:43 pm | 11.2 overs: WICKET! Slowly DC are edging towards their doom! Praveen Kumar to Sangakkara, out Caught by Saini!! Breathtaking catch by Saini. Punjab have struck thrice in the space of 8 balls! This was a beauty from Praveen Kumar, pitched on middle, swung away and got the outside edge, Saini dived to his left to take a stunning one hander. Sangakkara c Saini b Praveen Kumar 4(6) (DC 74/5 in 11.2 overs)Akshath Reddy, right handed bat, comes to the crease 10:41 pm | 10.4 overs: WICKET! Another one takes bow! David Hussey to Cameron White, out Caught by Shaun Marsh!! Another big wicket for Hussey, he has taken out two stalwarts of this batting order. Tossed up on middle stump, Cameron White looks to go for a big six over the on side, doesn’t time it well and is caught at deep midwicket by Marsh. An all Australian wicket! Cameron White c Shaun Marsh b David Hussey 8(14) [4s-1] (DC 71/4 in 10.4 overs) Kumar Sangakkara, left handed bat, comes to the crease 10:38 pm | 10.1 overs: WICKET! DC opener Harris walks back. David Hussey to Dan Harris, out Caught by Awana!! Hussey strikes first ball! Flat and outside off, Dan Harris looked to drive, got a thick outside edge which lobs up to Awana at point. Easy catch for him, he makes no mistake. The skipper has something to say to his fellow Australian. This is what pressure can do to you, the last over from Mahmood went only for 2. Dan Harris c Awana b David Hussey 30(29) [4s-2 6s-1] (DC 70/3 in 10.1 overs)Cameron White, right handed bat, comes to the crease 10:13 pm | 4.6 overs: WICKET! Awana gets rid of Parthiv. Awana to Parthiv Patel, out Bowled!! Six and out! Length delivery on middle, it keeps a bit low, Parthiv Patel looks to flick across the line and misses it completely. The ball crashes into the stumps and Deccan lose their second left hander. Parthiv Patel b Awana 17(13) [4s-1 6s-1] (DC 31/2 in 4.6 overs)advertisementParthiv Patel, left handed bat, comes to the crease 9:59 pm | 1.5 overs: WICKET! Huge setback for DC as in-form Dhawan walks off. Praveen Kumar to Dhawan, out Caught by Azhar Mahmood!! Big swing for PK and Dhawan is on his way. It was a good length delivery on middle, nipped away to the off side, Dhawan came down the track and tried to drive and gets a thick outside edge which is lapped up by Mahmood at slip. Dhawan c Azhar Mahmood b Praveen Kumar 8(6) [4s-1] (DC 10/1 in 1.5 overs)9:55 pm | 0.5 overs: Powar to Dhawan, FOUR, it was in the air for a long time, but the fielder running in from the circle couldn’t get to it. Well flighted up on middle, Dhawan comes down the track and lofts it back over the bowler, rolls down to the boundary rope9:53 pm | 0.1 overs: Powar to Dan Harris, no run, starts off with a flat delivery on middle, Dan Harris flicks it to the leg side9:52 pm | Dan Harris and Dhawan are at the crease. Dan Harris is on strike. Powar will open the attackDECCAN CHARGERS: Target – 171 in 20 oversKINGS XI PUNJAB: 170/5 in 20 overs (Mandeep Singh 75)170 is a big total and Punjab will be delighted with their effort. Mandeep was outstanding as he stroked a wonderful FIFTY. All the other batsmen played around him and Miller struck some lusty blows towards the end. The Deccan bowlers bowled too short and were inconsistent. The batsmen need to step up and bat really well if Deccan are to achieve victory. Join us in a bit for the Punjab innings. Theron: It is a big job to fill Steyn’s place. I am happy with the my effort. The wicket is slow. 160 is a par score but it is a good wicket if the batsmen adjust well. 9:36 pm | 19.6 overs: Ashish Reddy to David Miller, 1 run, a full toss on middle, Miller thumps it to long on, the ball hit the bat high on the splice and so he does not time it well. (KXIP put 170/5 in 20 overs) 18.6 overs: DROPPED! Theron to David Miller, 1 run, catch dropped by White, full ball just outside off, Miller thrashes it hard to long off, White moves to his left and tries to take the catch on the move, but he spills the chance and they take only a single, that was really travelling but White should have taken it.Siddharth Chitnis, right handed bat, comes to the crease 9:23 pm | 16.6 overs: WICKET! Azhar scores a quick 14. Theron to Azhar Mahmood, out Azhar Mahmood Run Out!! Oh dear, total confusion and Mahmood has to depart. Shortish ball outside off, Mahmood looks to force it through cover and he gets an outside edge that rolls to backward point, Mahmood is ball watching as Miller sets off for a quick single, the batsmen stop and stutter, Mahmood belatedly sets off for the single, but Ashish fires the throw to Theron who breaks the stumps and catches Mahmood short. Azhar Mahmood run out (Ashish Reddy / Theron) 14(9) [4s-2] (KXIP 138/5 in 17 overs)advertisementDavid Miller, left handed bat, comes to the crease 9:13 pm | 15.3 overs: WICKET! Finally Mandeep falls after a quick and solid 75. Ashish Reddy to Mandeep Singh, out Bowled!! Mandeep’s superb innings comes to an end. Another back of the hand slower delivery from Ashish, he lands it on a full length and it breaks back in as Mandeep bends down, he attempts to slog across the line but misses it and the ball clips the off stump. Mandeep Singh b Ashish Reddy 75(48) [4s-8 6s-3] (KXIP 130/4 in 15.3 overs)Azhar Mahmood, right handed bat, comes to the crease 8:55 pm | 11.6 overs: WICKET! Captain Hussey departs! Pratap Singh to David Hussey, out Caught by Dan Harris!! Something to cheer for Veer Pratap Singh. Full ball just outside off, Hussey looks to loft it over long off but ends up miscuing it, he fails to generate the power and Harris settles underneath it easily. David Hussey c Dan Harris b Pratap Singh 16(16) [4s-1 6s-1] (KXIP 97/3 in 11.6 overs)8:50 pm | 10.6 overs: Dan Harris to Mandeep Singh, FOUR, awesome way to get to his FIFTY, length ball outside off, Mandeep backs away a touch and clubs it inside out over extra cover for a boundaryDavid Hussey, right handed bat, comes to the crease 8:32 pm | 7.4 overs: WICKET! Ashish Reddy to Saini, out Lbw!! The back of the hand slower delivery does the trick for Ashish, he lands this delivery on a good length and it cuts back in, Saini goes on the backfoot and looks to work it to mid wicket, he misses it and gets hit on the pads, Ashish appeals and umpire Dharmasena gives it out, it looked to be sliding down the leg side at first glance, but we need a replay to confirm it. Saini lbw b Ashish Reddy 2(4) (KXIP 58/2 in 7.4 overs)Nitin Saini, right handed bat, comes to the crease 8:28 pm | 6.5 overs: WICKET! Dhawan to Shaun Marsh, out Bowled!! Dhawan has broken a dangerous stand. Flatter and full delivery on the middle and leg stump, Marsh skips down the track and looks to whip it through mid wicket, the ball hits his pad and then goes back onto the stumps, that has gotten the crowd going at Uppal. Shaun Marsh b Dhawan 22(20) [4s-3] (KXIP 58/1 in 7.2 overs)8:23 pm | 5.3 overs: Theron to Shaun Marsh, FOUR, awesome batting this, full ball just outside off, Marsh blasts it past Theron and it screams away to the long on fence, it also brings up the FIFTY partnership8:04 pm | 1 over: KXIP are 5/0 at the stage. Mandeep Singh is batting on 4 and Shaun Marsh on 1. An okay start to their innings, but KXIP will look to accelerate.8:00 pm | Mandeep Singh and Shaun Marsh are at the crease. Mandeep Singh is on strike. Jhunjunwala will open the attack Teams  Deccan Chargers (Playing XI): Daniel Harris, Shikhar Dhawan, Cameron White, Kumar Sangakkara(c), Parthiv Patel(w), Abhishek Jhunjunwala, Ashish Reddy, Akshath Reddy, Amit Mishra, Juan Theron, Veer Pratap Singh Kings XI Punjab (Playing XI): Shaun Marsh, Mandeep Singh, Nitin Saini(w), David Hussey(c), David Miller, Azhar Mahmood, Siddharth Chitnis, Piyush Chawla, Ramesh Powar, Praveen Kumar, Parvinder AwanaDavid Hussey: I am enjoying the role as a captain. Gilly was desparate to play tonight but the physio ruled him out. He should play the next fixture. We have got to do the hard yards and we need to win the next four. We would have batted first anyway. David Miller comes in for Ryan Harris, Sid Chitnis comes in and so does Ramesh Powar. Sangakkara: Ya we are looking to turn things around and start winnings. We have played well but have failed to deliver at the crunch situations. I think we were in a position to be about seven places up but we haven’t fielded well enough. We have batted and bowled well but in tough situations the fielding matters and we have let ourselves down there. The deck looks like it will stay the same throughout. The par score is 150-160 so anything below that will be great. We just need to trust what we are doing. Rusty Theron comes in. 7:30 pm | TOSS – Deccan Chargers have won the toss and elected to fieldlast_img read more