Month: August 2019

Tethercell battery could redefine smartphone control

Tethercell battery could redefine smartphone control

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—An Indiegogo project by Tetherboard drew interest at CES in Las Vegas this week where a novel concept of phone battery was demonstrated. The prototype on show was Tethercell, an adapter which the user can control from a smartphone or tablet, The adapter, powered by a AAA-battery, embeds Bluetooth into a traditional AA battery form. A Tethercell holds an AAA battery inside its little case. Explore further The design is a plastic enclosure with wireless circuitry the size of an AA battery. According to the product creators, Trey Madhyastha and Kellan O’Connor, mechanical design engineers, “The electronic brains embedded within the Tethercell contains a lot of cutting-edged electronics based upon the TI CC2540 microcontroller.” They said it is packed with a current sensing OP-AMP comparator, temperature sensor, N-channel MOSFET (capable of switching up to 5A), 1.5 to 3V boost converter and embedded 8051 microcontroller.”Tethercell uses Bluetooth 4.0, a low-power Bluetooth protocol. “With Bluetooth Smart Ready the range of use with Tethercell should extend to about 60 feet through one wall,” the creators said on their campaign site. They also said that they conducted some open field tests where they demonstrated connectivity at distances over 100 feet. “As with any RF device, environment plays a significant role in the performance of Tethercell. We are confident in stating these range figures as we routinely exceed them in testing.”For the present, Tethercell will support AA-batteries and iOS. The goal is for the product to start shipping in June. IPhone 4S first phone for low-power Bluetooth More information: www.indiegogo.com/tethercellcenter_img Tethercell comes with an app, and once the device is battery-operated with the product, one can time activities, get alerts when batteries are running low, and other tasks. The user can set hours when a device can be used; AA battery-powered devices can be turned on and off remotely; Tethercell can help to set device schedules to save battery power; and set simple timers. Instead of a phone running on batteries, in a sense, the batteries are helping to run the phone, as the Tethercell turns phone batteries into Bluetooth devices. It works by the user taking out one AA battery and replacing it with a Tethercell with an AAA battery within it. No matter how many AA batteries are required to run the device, only one Tethercell would be needed. Then a Tetherboard app downloaded from the App store would be started up and the user would connect to an iOS device that is Bluetooth Smart compatible. Citation: Tethercell battery could redefine smartphone control (2013, January 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-01-tethercell-battery-redefine-smartphone.html © 2013 Phys.org The creators are offering the product as an Early Bird Special at $29 as part of its indiegogo campaign. Funds obtained from the campaign will be applied to such activities as finalizing the app design and electrical board layout, ordering parts and tooling for the shell and stampings, and obtaining certifications. Their goal is to raise $59,000. At the time of this writing, with 43 days left, they raised $11,335.last_img read more

Spacebased experiment could test gravitys effects on quantum entanglement

Spacebased experiment could test gravitys effects on quantum entanglement

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: New Journal of Physics © 2014 Phys.org Using a quantum field theory framework, the physicists have expanded upon previous research that showed that changes in acceleration affect entanglement. Due to the equivalence principle, this means that changes in gravity should also affect entanglement. This is exactly what the physicists found in their analysis. Their proposed experiment involves two space experimentalists, whom the scientists call Valentina and Yuri—named after Valentina Tereshkova and Yuri Gagarin, the first woman and man to go to space. Valentina and Yuri each prepare a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), an ultracold group of atoms occupying their lowest energy state, which allows quantum effects to become visible on the macroscopic scale. The BECs’ phonon modes are then entangled with each other.Each BEC, which together with its enclosing and maintaining apparatuses has a volume of 0.5 liters, is then loaded onto its own 20 cm x 20 cm nanosatellite. Currently, researchers are working on the CanX 4 and CanX 5 nanosatellites with these dimensions. The nanosatellites start out by moving in the same circular orbit but in opposite directions. Then one of them receives a “velocity kick”—a change in velocity that moves it to an elliptical orbit. After navigating half of this new orbit, a second velocity kick puts the satellite into another circular orbit, different from the first one. Now the two satellites are in different orbits.The degradation of entanglement between the BECs is expected to occur immediately after the orbit-hopping BEC undergoes its first change in velocity, and can be observed any time that BEC is moving in a different orbit. Although detecting entanglement between the phonon modes in BECs has not yet been achieved, it is currently a topic of great interest and may be possible in the near future. Since CanX 4 and CanX 5 are designed to determine positions with an accuracy of cm, even a small change in orbit should lead to an observable effect on the initial quantum entanglement. Although entanglement can suffer a relatively large degradation due to a change in gravity, there is a bright side to the effect. The researchers also found that the strength of the entanglement oscillates periodically with respect to the gravitational difference between the two orbits. This means that it may be possible to find a situation in which entanglement is not degraded by accurately controlling the satellites’ positions. This is one way in which the results will allow researchers to maximize the potential uses of future space-based quantum technologies.”I believe that our results can be employed to develop future quantum communication and positioning technologies, ultraprecise accelerometers and navigation systems which would benefit from our better understanding of the interplay between quantum physics and relativity theory,” Bruschi said.In the future, the researchers plan to further investigate both the fundamental and practical aspects of quantum and relativistic effects.”My goal is to develop space-based relativistic quantum technologies that will exploit both quantum and relativistic effects to bring the game to the next level,” Bruschi said. “I believe that there is much to learn about the overlap of quantum mechanics and relativity theory at large scales and that the applications can be far reaching: from providing a theoretical basis for future space technologies to deepening our understanding of the laws of nature.” (Phys.org) —Physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena. In a new proposed experiment in this area, two toaster-sized “nanosatellites” carrying entangled condensates orbit around the Earth, until one of them moves to a different orbit with a different gravitational field strength. As a result of the change in gravity, the entanglement between the condensates is predicted to degrade by up to 20%. Experimentally testing the proposal may be possible in the near future. Micro-macro entangled ‘cat states’ could one day test quantum gravity More information: David Edward Bruschi, et al. “Testing the effects of gravity and motion on quantum entanglement in space-based experiments.” New Journal of Physics. DOI: 10.1088/1367-2630/16/5/053041 Explore further In the proposed experiment, two entangled BECs in separate satellites begin by moving in the same circular orbit (small orbit in the illustration). Then one of them undergoes an acceleration in order to change to a different circular orbit by means of an elliptical transfer orbit. The change in gravity is predicted to cause a degradation of the entanglement between the BECs. Credit: Bruschi, et al. ©2014 IOP Publishing Ltd Citation: Space-based experiment could test gravity’s effects on quantum entanglement (2014, May 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-05-space-based-gravity-effects-quantum-entanglement.html The paper, which is published in a recent issue of the New Journal of Physics by David Edward Bruschi, et al., theoretically demonstrates how relativistic effects impact the quantum world. “Our work shows that it is possible to test gravitational effects, which are thought to affect classical systems at large and very large scales, with genuinely (small) entangled quantum systems,” Bruschi told Phys.org. “Our results aid the understanding of the effects of relativity on entanglement, an important resource for quantum information processing. Since we lack a theory that merges quantum theory and relativity, our work can help direct future theoretical and experimental efforts that investigate quantum effects at large scales.”Besides being of fundamental interest, understanding how gravity and other relativistic features affect quantum entanglement will help physicists develop quantum technologies for space-based applications. In a sense, space-based quantum technologies will take classical space-based technologies such as GPS into the quantum regime. It’s well-known that GPS satellites require relativistic corrections to accurately determine time and position, and the same will hold true for quantum technologies.While GPS is widespread, however, quantum technologies have not yet been developed for the space environment, although several ideas have been proposed. While most of these proposals fall under the framework of the theory of quantum mechanics, the new proposal differs in that is developed within the framework of quantum field theory. This theory merges quantum theory and relativity in the sense that matter and radiation are quantized, while space time is treated as a classical background. The physicists here argue that quantum field theory provides a better model for understanding the effects of gravity on quantum properties.last_img read more

New technique for using sugarcane to make jet fuel cuts greenhouse gas

New technique for using sugarcane to make jet fuel cuts greenhouse gas

first_img More information: Novel pathways for fuels and lubricants from biomass optimized using life-cycle greenhouse gas assessment, Madhesan Balakrishnan, PNAS, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1508274112AbstractDecarbonizing the transportation sector is critical to achieving global climate change mitigation. Although biofuels will play an important role in conventional gasoline and diesel applications, bioderived solutions are particularly important in jet fuels and lubricants, for which no other viable renewable alternatives exist. Producing compounds for jet fuel and lubricant base oil applications often requires upgrading fermentation products, such as alcohols and ketones, to reach the appropriate molecular-weight range. Ketones possess both electrophilic and nucleophilic functionality, which allows them to be used as building blocks similar to alkenes and aromatics in a petroleum refining complex. Here, we develop a method for selectively upgrading biomass-derived alkyl methyl ketones with >95% yields into trimer condensates, which can then be hydrodeoxygenated in near-quantitative yields to give a new class of cycloalkane compounds. The basic chemistry developed here can be tailored for aviation fuels as well as lubricants by changing the production strategy. We also demonstrate that a sugarcane biorefinery could use natural synergies between various routes to produce a mixture of lubricant base oils and jet fuels that achieve net life-cycle greenhouse gas savings of up to 80%.Press release Citation: New technique for using sugarcane to make jet fuel cuts greenhouse gas emissions (2015, June 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-06-technique-sugarcane-jet-fuel-greenhouse.html World’s first biofuel jet flight to take off in Canada © 2015 Phys.org (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the University of California has developed a new technique for converting sugarcane biomass into jet fuel that they claim reduces greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes their process and their hopes that it can eventually be used to power aircraft. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciencescenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Over the past couple of decades, researchers have put a lot of time, money and effort into finding alternatives to petroleum based fuels, partly as a result of petroleum price fluctuations and partly as a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Such efforts have resulted in the development of a wide variety of fuels, many of which are now being put to a wide variety of uses. One notable exception has been jet fuel (which contributes a reported 2 percent of all carbon emissions into the atmosphere), due to its more stringent requirements. In this new effort, the researchers describe a technique they have developed (with funding from BP) that allows for developing fuel that meets the requirements for jet aircraft. Efforts to create a cleaner jet fuel have intensified only over the past decade, thus such fuel research is still in its infancy, those created thus far have been approved for use as recently as 2011.For fuel to be useful in jets, it must be free of oxygen, because it adds mass that is not used as fuel, thus, it does nothing but take up precious space in gas tanks. The fuel must also be stable at extremely low temperatures, i.e. not gel at high altitude temperatures in the -40C range. It must also have just the right boiling point and certain degree of lubricity so it will not cause wear on turbines. Another problem with developing fuel from plant matter is the problem of converting crop land to use for fuel, that is why the researchers with this new effort chose sugarcane.The process involves separating out the sucrose in sugarcane which is then used to derive methyl ketones which then serve as building blocks for the fuel that is eventually produced. The same method, the researchers report, can also be used to create lubricants for use in automobiles and diesel fuel. Explore further Sugarcane. Credit: Woods Hole Research Centerlast_img read more

Researchers break record for atoms positioned individually in a trap to create

Researchers break record for atoms positioned individually in a trap to create

first_imgA team of researchers at Technische Universität Darmstadt has broken the record for the number of atoms positioned individually in a trap to create a defect-free array. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group explains how they built their trap and their plans for making even larger ones. Citation: Researchers break record for atoms positioned individually in a trap to create defect-free arrays (2019, May 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-atoms-positioned-individually-defect-free-arrays.html Building 3-D atomic structures atom by atom using lasers , arXiv Credit: D. Ohl de Mello et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (2019) More information: Daniel Ohl de Mello et al. Defect-Free Assembly of 2D Clusters of More Than 100 Single-Atom Quantum Systems, Physical Review Letters (2019). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.122.203601On arXiv: arXiv:1902.00284v4 [quant-ph], arxiv.org/abs/1902.00284. Explore further Journal information: Physical Review Letters Scientists working to build a truly useful quantum computer believe that it will be necessary to trap neutral atoms in arrays of dipoles to serve as qubits. The prior record number of trapped atoms in such a trap was 72. In this new effort, the researchers have pushed the new record to 111. They claim their method is also scalable and that it should be possible to use it to create arrays holding up to a million or more atoms.To create their array, the researchers started with a cloud of rubidium atoms in a vacuum held in place by a magneto-optical trap. Next, they allowed the atoms in the cloud to cool. When they reached 100 μKelvin, they were moved to a microtrap array they had built using hundreds of laser traps that had been arranged in a square.The team reports that in its initial stage, each of the traps contained a few atoms—they whittled them down to each holding just one or zero atoms by using a collisional blockade. They followed that by creating an image of the system to allow them to identify which traps held an atom and which were empty. They then placed a single atom in each of the empty traps using optical tweezers. Once all the empty traps had been filled, the team imaged the array once again to make sure that each trap had just a single atom in it. They note that the process of adding a single atom to an empty slot could be used again if any were found empty.They further report that their process was used to create a 10×10 2D square array of atoms, a 105-atom checkerboard array and one made from two squares connected together that had 111 atoms. They add that they are currently at work building an array that can hold 1000 atoms and claim that the only roadblock to building much larger arrays is cost. © 2019 Science X Network This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Picking Popovas brain

Picking Popovas brain

first_imgA Bulgarian settled in New York, Maria Popova in her spare time digs for books that one won’t find at first glance in bookshops. And for seven years now she has been religiously creating a database of these interesting finds and sharing it with others.The canary yellow that greets you when you open her web site, brainpickings.org, clues you immediately towards her taste in books: very pop art-ish. For someone who learnt about the world around her through her grandmother’s encyclopaedias, shuttered as she was in the hidden depth of the communist world, she has a distinct taste for all things colourful. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Digging through her web site is worth your time (she spends 450 hours a month to put them together for you, btw) as you are likely to find a gem of a book that you like. We picked a few of her 2012 favourites… Happy reading. BOOK 1 : Drawings from the CityPublisher : Tara BooksPrice : Rs 750From visionary Indian indie publisher Tara Books, who for nearly two decades have been giving voice to marginalised art and literature through a commune of artists, writers, and designers collaborating on beautifully crafted books celebrating Indian folk art traditions. Their latest gem, Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixDrawing from the City by artist Tejubehan, is both more exquisite and born out of a more moving personal story than just about any book I’ve come across. Its gorgeous black-and-white pen-and-ink drawings, brimming with expressive lines and dots somewhere between Yayoi Kusama and Edward Gorey, tell the partly autobiographical, partly escapist tale of this self-taught artist who came of age as a woman trapped between unimaginable poverty and a wildly imaginative inner world in a patriarchal society. Tejubehan takes us on a journey from her small village into the big city, where her poor parents move to find work. At its heart, however, the story is really a feminist story — a vision for women’s liberation in a culture with oppressive gender norms and limiting social expectations. In envisioning the woman of the city — biking, driving, flying — Tejubehan is really envisioning what it might be like to live in a world where to be female means to be free to move and free to just be.Like many of Tara’s other books, Drawing from the City has been silkscreen-printed and bound by hand on handmade paper. The cover is colored with traditional Indian dyes, emanating an enchanting earthy smell that reminds you what it’s like to hold an analog labour of love in your analog human hands.BOOK 2: Building StoriesPublisher: Knopf DoubledayPrice : Rs 2885Building Stories is a remarkable storytelling artifact by cartoonist Chris Ware, more than a decade in the making — a giant box containing 14 individual print ephemera (books, booklets, comic strips, magazines, and even a gold-rimmed hardcover and a board game), each telling the interlocking tales of different residents of the same three-story Chicago brownstone, from the couple caught in a loveless relationship on the second floor, to the elderly spinster grappling with her own aging, to the bee trapped in the basement. Somewhere between Paula Scher’s vintage children’s book The Brownstone, the Cold-War-era experimental Polish short film Blok, and artist Yasmine Chatila’s Stolen Moments series, the project — which I hesitate to call a ‘book’, since it’s a lavish deal more — is at once voyeuristic and deeply intimate, exploring the boundless complexities of inner worlds, relationships, and the hopeful hopelessness of being human.BOOK 3: 100 Ideas that Changed Graphic DesignPublisher : Laurence King Price : Rs 1728Design history books abound, but they tend to be organised by chronology and focused on concrete-isms. From publisher Laurence King, who brought us the epic Saul Bass monograph, and the prolific design writer Steven Heller with design critic Veronique Vienne comes 100 Ideas that Changed Graphic Design — a thoughtfully curated inventory of abstract concepts that defined and shaped the art and craft of graphic design, each illustrated with exemplary images and historical context, and one of the year’s best design books. From concepts like manifestos (#25), pictograms (#45), propaganda (#22), found typography (#38), and the Dieter-Rams-coined philosophy that “less is more” (#73) to favorite creators like Alex Steinweiss, Noma Bar, Saul Bass, Paula Scher, and Stefan Sagmeister, the sum of these carefully constructed parts amounts to an astute lens not only on what design is and does, but also on what it should be and do.BOOK 4: 100 Diagrams That Changed the World Publisher : Plume Books Price : Rs 1443Since the dawn of recorded history, we’ve been using visual depictions to map the Earth, order the heavens, make sense of time, dissect the human body, organize the natural world, perform music, and even concretize abstract concepts like consciousness and love. 100 Diagrams That Changed the World by investigative journalist and documentarian Scott Christianson chronicles the history of our evolving understanding of the world through humanity’s most groundbreaking sketches, illustrations, and drawings, ranging from cave paintings to The Rosetta Stone to Moses Harris’s color wheel to Tim Berners-Lee’s flowchart for a ‘mesh’ information management system, the original blueprint for the world wide web. But most noteworthy of all is the way in which these diagrams bespeak an essential part of culture — the awareness that everything builds on what came before, that creativity is combinatorial, and that the most radical innovations harness the cross-pollination of disciplines. BOOK 5: Abstract CityPublisher : AbramsPrice : Rs 1440Since 2008, Christoph Niemann — LEGO-lover, imagination instigator, metaphorical chicken-chaser — has been delighting us with his visual blog for The New York Times, in which he has explored everything from his love-hate relationship with coffee to the fall of the Berlin Wall to his obsession with maps to the familiar drudgery of red-eye flights. Abstract City gathers 16 of his visual essays, infused with his signature blend of humour, thoughtfulness, and exquisite conceptual freshness. An additional chapter on his creative process, echoing his excellent Creative Mornings talk on the same subject, presents the ultimate cherry on top.For more, log on to Maria Popova’s web site, brainpickings.orglast_img read more

Music to match your mood

Music to match your mood

first_imgAiming to develop cultural tourism in the city, it is a platform for upcoming artistes to perform at the grand stage every weekend.The festival is held in collaboration with Department of Art, Culture and Languages, Govt. of Delhi. Last Sunday, Dilli Haat Janak Puri experienced a soothing ambiance with thoughtful singing of Zafar Hayat Nizami from Urdu Academy. He held the audience attention by performing sufiana Qawwali Dama Dum Mast Kalandar along with other creations of Hazrat Ameer Khusrao. Zafar Hayat Nizami’s group consisted of eight members and he belongs to Sikandarabad Gharana. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Ashok Mastie, famed Punjabi singer and who performed on the  2nd weekend of the festival says, ‘Dilli Haat Utsav is an attractive concept giving a live platform to artistes. A live stage show is always better than recordings. The mood of the audience while the performance, is in itself the first barrier to judge the talent. There is no better judge than the audience.’He further adds, ‘I am happy that artists are getting a systematic platform to perform. It is extremely positive to see that Dilli Haats have opened gates for new artists. Apart working hard on performing, now the only work that a talented person needs to do is register with respective department for a slot.’ Ashok Mastie who had also made a guest appearance at the 8th weekend of the festival, had on stage talked about the Punjabi talent pool. He is currently working on his upcoming Bollywood projects.last_img read more

The Journey of a monk

The Journey of a monk

first_imgThe Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts (IGNCA) Film Circle screens two films a month on the second and fourth Friday. This friday the film Buddhism in Sikkim directed by Sumit Banerjee will be screened.The film, in three parts, takes you on a journey through the fascinating and no less inspiring story of Buddha’s life, his teaching, Buddhist practices, the emergence of two sects – Theravada and Mahayana, and the coming of Buddhism to Sikkim via Tibet in 15th-16th century. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The film also focuses on the ultimate goal is to reach Buddha hood a stage beyond Nirvana and the path is through six ‘paramitas’ or transcendental and wisdom. Becoming a monk is a difficult journey, one has to undergo nine year of hard training in a monastery. Moreover, the film highlights the monastery, which is a complete world by itself. Monastery is not a simple building, but has set design, intricately carved with mural paintings and structures, in which Mani wheels and Thangka paintings have their own significance. How Tibetan Buddhism and culture gets merged with indigenous practices in Sikkim, have a peep into the life of Lepchas.When: February 27 Where: IGNCA Media Centre Auditorium Time: 5.00 pmlast_img read more

Visa on Arrival ups Feb foreign tourist inflows by 1161

Visa on Arrival ups Feb foreign tourist inflows by 1161

first_imgThe number of foreign tourist arriving in India has increased by 1,161 per cent in February as compared to the same month the previous year since Visa on Arrival (VoA)-enabled electronic travel authorisation scheme become operational.A total 24,985 foreign tourists arrived in the country availing the scheme in February this year as compared to 1,980 during the month of February 2014, registering a growth of 1161.9 per cent, according to Tourism Ministry data. Government has launched Visa on Arrival enabled ETA on November 27, 2014 for 43 countries.The scheme was further extended to the citizens of Guyana in January this year.Continuing the growth trajectory, Incredible India campaign has attracted 50,008 foreigners who availed the scheme during January-February 2015 as compared to 3,883 in the same period last year, registering a growth of 1187.9 per cent.last_img read more

Turkey releases recording of warnings to Russian plane

Turkey releases recording of warnings to Russian plane

first_imgTurkey released audio recordings of what it says are the Turkish military’s warnings to the pilot of the Russian plane that was shot down at the border with Syria.The recordings, made available to The Associated Press today, indicate that the plane was warned several times that it was approaching Turkey’s airspace and asked to change course.Turkey shot down the Russian Su-24 bomber on Tuesday, insisting that it had violated its airspace despite repeated warnings. Also Read – Nine hurt in accident at fireworks show in French resortA surviving Russian pilot has denied that his jet veered into Turkey’s airspace and rejected Turkey’s claim that it had issued repeated warnings to the Russian crew.The series of 10 audio clips were released by the prime minister’s office and sourced to the Turkish Armed Forces.In the recordings, a voice is heard saying in broken English: This is Turkish Air Force speaking on guard. You are approaching Turkish airspace. Change your heading south immediately. Most of the audio is garbled and barely comprehensible but the tone of the voice gets more agitated as the warnings appear to go unnoticed. Also Read – Pakistan Army ‘fully prepared’ to face any challenge: Army spokesmanTuesday’s incident was the first time in half a century that a NATO member shot down a Russian plane. Russia said yesterday it will deploy long-range air defense missiles to its base in Syria and destroy any target that may threaten its warplanes.One of the Russian pilots was killed by militants in Syria after ejecting from the plane, while his crewmate was rescued by Syrian army commandos.A Russian marine was also killed by the militants during the rescue mission.Speaking in televised comments from the Russian base in Syria, the surviving navigator of the downed plane, Capt Konstantin Murakhtin, maintained the plane did not enter the Turkish airspace “even for a single second.”last_img read more

First of 32 trapped labourers returns from Malaysia

First of 32 trapped labourers returns from Malaysia

first_imgKolkata: Sanjay Mallick, one of the labourers from Bengal who had been trapped in Malaysia for more than a month, is finally returning home on an Air Asia flight on Sunday night. Mallick was one of the two victims who had sent an audio message through an app to the National Anti Trafficking Committee (NATC), seeking assistance on Friday.”We managed to contact the supervisor of the company who was supposed to employ Sanjay and I had a two hour conversation with him in the morning, regarding the strong measures that are being taken for their rescue. Soon after this, I was contacted by Sanjay from the airport, saying that he has been handed over his passport and visa and dropped at the local airport. We arranged for his tickets and he is returning home. Once he is rescued, it will be easier for us to locate the other persons who are trapped there,” said Sheikh Jinnar Ali, national chairman of NATC. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeMallick and Julfikar Ali Mondal, in their audio message to NATC on Friday, had narrated their plight stating that 32 people from the state have been trapped after they were lured with the promise of lucrative jobs in Malaysia. The NATC chairman informed the matter to Union minister of External Affairs, the office of Prime Minister and the state Chief Minister, Consulate General Malaysia in India and the state Criminal Investigation Department (CID) about their plight, urging them to take up the matter and take steps for their rescue. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killed”I have received an e-mail that a five member team has been formed by the PMO to rescue them,” Ali added. The victims had gone to Malaysia through an agent at Gopalnagar in North 24-Parganas under tourist visa for jobs as construction labourers. Recently, 12 people from the state who had found themselves in similar plight after they were lured with the promise of jobs in the jewellery industry, were rescued after they had communicated a similar voice message to the NATC.last_img read more